Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, September 24, 1836

  • Posted on: 10 March 2016
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, September 24, 1836
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:alc

student editor

Transcriber:spp:keh

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1836-09-24

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, September 24, 1836

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location:
x

transcription: alc 

revision: ekk 2015-05-29

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Page 1
Saturday Sep 24th
My Dearest Henry, I received another kind
letter last evening, I commence one to day
with the intention of writing a little every
day until it is completed. That is indeed a
good old custom of yours writing every day
which I intend once more to adopt. There are so
many little incidents which at the time of their
occurrence interest us and would amuse our
correspondents that are not related when the lapse of a few days has divested them of their
importance. Monday afternoon I wrote but a few
lines on Saturday and was prevented finishing
my letter yesterday by a violent nervous head
ache. Our little girl
Birth: 1836-08-25 Death: 1837-01-14
does not allow me much
sleep, but I feel considerably better to day,
my first employment this morning was reading
a long letter from you which contained the
account of the apprehended insurrection.
I am very glad it terminated with so little trouble
You have always spoken so confidently of the security
of your situation that I have not allowed myself
to feel much uneasiness on the subject I have
trusted too in a great measure to your own pacific
disposition but you must not forget how much
happiness is involved in your safety or fail to
take all necessary precautions. Harriet
 Death: 1888-08-20
and
Nicholas
Birth: 1801-12-24 Death: 1893
are with you before this time and have
told you all about home. It is your home after all
Page 2

and I do not much like to hear any other called
so I find. You seem to have commenced
housekeeping on a large scale or rather
in a large house. I have no doubt the
place is very pretty, we all anticipate much
pleasure in visiting you next summer.
Tuesday morning. Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
received your
letter this morning it made him very happy
he thinks he would like very much to be
with you and gather some of the nuts you
mention. You do not know what a pet
the little girl is Augustus is particularly
fond of her he watches all her movements and
kisses her rather oftener than is convenient
They both go regularly to school every day,
they are a great comfort to one but I would
not be so selfish as to monopolize them
entirely. Your letter intimating a wish to have
Augustus came with Harriet only reached me the evening before they left. They were unaccus-
tomed to traveling and had two little ones
of their own to attend to. I should not
have thought it quite safe to have entrusted
our little boy to their care although I
have the utmost confidence in their fidelity.
Of course Pa
Birth: 1772-04-11 Death: 1851-11-13
would have thought the prospect
insane so I said nothing about it, I thought
George Humphries
Birth: 1814-03-15 Death: 1885-06-09
would have come here
Page 3

before he returned to Westfield in that case I would
have sent Augustus with him. Augustus talks
a great deal about the ponies and hopes
they may be gentle enough for him to ride.
I went down stairs yesterday for the first time
and shall go again to day. Mrs Dean
Unknown
is still
with me I have engaged Mrs Benedict
Unknown
. when
she is called away. Cornelia grows at
the rate of about a pound per week, she has been
twice weighed since you left home. Mrs
Dean says she has nursed in her day
nearly 200 babies never saw one
who carried so much intelligence as ours
at the age of 4 weeks, of course she
predicts an early death but does not say
much to me about it. The little thing is
healthy and fat and if she does laugh and
crow when she feels good natured her mother
does not feel especially unhappy about it.
I endeavor to bear in mind constantly that all our
treasures here are only lent us for a season
and do not as I once did allow gloomy forebodings
of the future to disturb my present tranquility.
I do not say that I am always subject to the influence
of religion or reason but I hope I am more so than
in days gone by. We must not begin to expect you
home yet I suppose, we shall all be very glad when you
do come. I could write much more but my eyes
fail me your own Frances.
Page 4

I wish if you find time you would write a few lines
to Harriet in answer to her last letters I think she
expects it. I will continue to write some every day
but hope not to leave you so long again without
a letter.
William H. Seward
Westfield
Chatauque County
AUBURN N.Y.
Sep. 28
x

Stamp

Type: postmark

Hand Shiftx

William Seward

Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
Frances
Sept. 28, 1836