Letter from Frances Alvah Worden to Augustus Henry Seward, Febuary 26, 1849

  • Posted on: 27 July 2016
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Letter from Frances Alvah Worden to Augustus Henry Seward, Febuary 26, 1849
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:ekk

student editor

Transcriber:spp:dxt

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1849-02-26

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Letter from Frances Alvah Worden to Augustus Henry Seward, Febuary 26, 1849

action: sent

sender: Frances Chesebro
Birth: 1826  Death: 1909-08-24

location: Flatbush, NY

receiver: Augustus Seward
Birth: 1826-10-01  Death: 1876-09-11

location: Unknown
Unknown

transcription: ekk 

revision: obm 2016-05-13

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Page 1

Flatbush Feb 26th 49
My dear Cousin,
I have long been wishing
to write to you, but have been unable
to for two reasons, one, many times
have not [ know ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: known
where to direct
you having been roving so of late
that it has been almost impossible
to know where to find you. very
often after receiving word from your
mother
Birth: 1805-09-24 Death: 1865-06-21
of your station. mail
would come before we’d time to
write that you were somewhere
else- so from you so often chang-
ing and we not knowing how
to direct to you has prevented
our writing. then my having
been so sick a great portion of
the time has prevented my
writing.
You see we are at present

[top Margin] suppose we should
like anyone you do.
Write soon and me
here___
your affectionate cousin
F.A.W.

Page 2

stationed at Flatbush. I
am here under the care
of an eminent physician
and hope soon to be able to
return home well. It is nearly
thirteen weeks since we came
here. the village I imagine
may be very pleasant in the
summer or when one is well.
during the greater portion of the
time we have been here mud
has been very plentiful Which
compels us to remain within
doors of our boarding house. No
place looks particularly agreeable
when one is compelled to re-
main ^in^ it because too ill to leave
it and Flatbush and I stand
in that relation to each other
The place is built after pattern
of some old Dutch town with
few of modern-built
houses and though we are
only five miles from the City
Page 3

of New York everything appears
as if we were hundred of
[ mils ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: miles
in the County. the
difficulty in getting into the city
prevents our going often so we
stay and wait (not) paitently
until we can go home.
We are looking for your father
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10

this week on his way to Washington
to take his seat in Congress and
to witness the inauguration of
your Genl
Birth: 1784-11-24 Death: 1850-07-09
You way off among
the Indians have known little
of the political excitement of the
Last year, but now it is happily
over and at least the greater
portion of the [ County ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: Country
are satisfied.
We are all looking forward
to seeing you this Spring I hope.
You may reach home safely.
and it will indeed be a
very happy time when you are
once more with us. You will
I suppose go back to the Army
Page 4

again but I hope your next
station may be nearer home
somewhere within the bounds
of civilisation. I was thinking the
other night of some years since
when we were all in Albany
together, and when we used to
go so often and merrilly to Mr.
Weeds
Birth: 1797-11-15 Death: 1882-11-22Certainty: Probable
. now we are grown men
and women and you are away
off, among the Choctaws. Aunty
wrote of the ball in Seneca
you attended. if the dance
was as amusing as your description
it must have been well
worth going 40 miles to attend.
I hope you will write to us
as soon as you receive these
letters, by that time we shall
probably be home. it would be
safest to direct to us there.
Dont bring home an Indian
Cousin for me. do not fall in
Love with a young squaw, but I