Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 15, 1852

  • Posted on: 18 July 2019
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 15, 1852
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:smc

student editor

Transcriber:spp:les

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1852-01-15

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 15, 1852

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: smc 

revision: vxa 2019-02-22

<>
Page 1

Washington Jan 15th
My dear Sister,
I received your letter last
evening saying you should come to
Auburn Tuesday– I hasten to write that
my letter may meet you there–
I know I will be disappointed not to meet
Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
but it was not possible for him
to be absent a whole day– Willie
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
came
much sooner than I had calculated
He surprised us Tuesday morning by
walking in while we were at breakfast–
He seems quite happy here for the present
next week he will commence his studies
and attend dancing school– Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
was
very glad to see him– her dolls which
have enjoyed so much of her time are
laid aside that she may play with
Willie– I will take it for granted
that you have received the last letter
I wrote to Fred which reg records the
departure of Kossuth
Birth: 1802-09-19 Death: 1894-03-20
and his family
x Birth: 1844-05-26  Death: 1914  Birth: 1843-05-13  Death: 1862-04-22  Birth: 1841-11-16  Death: 1914-05-25  Birth: 1809  Death: 1865 

This visit here seems like a bright
dream– I can say with Mrs Massingberd
Unknown

[top Margin]
The children send love–
Love to Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05

I want much to hear from you at Auburn
I have sent 2 or 3 papers– Your own
Sister–
Page 2

"no one who has not seen him often can
know what a glorious man he is"–
His is a rare combination of a moral and intellectual
greatness– I hope you have read his
speech at the Democratic dinner in this
City– there is much philosophy in it– much
Religion– I met Dr Dewey
Birth: 1794-03-28 Death: 1882-03-21
yesterday and
thought how greatly he had fallen in our
estimation since he appeared an advocate
for Slavery– I have no doubt that sermon
was written to secure the place he now
occupies– Pastor of the Unitarian Church
in the city– I met him at the house
of a lady
Unknown
who had called upon me to for
the purpose of ab obtaining a money to purchase
a poor woman
Unknown
who has been for 2 years
seeking a purchaser of her freedom– She
is one of many, but her case was particularly
calculated to excite compassion– W
"Reverend men, will upon their flocks,
Universal love impress,
And then stand up thank their God
For slavery's success"– these lines of Fred's
New Years address came forcibly to my
mind and I felt that I could not
be profited by the Rev. Dr Dewey's preaching–

[right Margin]
Kossuth
pronounced
Kosh, ut–
o & u both
short–
Page 3

What do you think of our Governor's
Birth: 1811-08-05 Death: 1867-02-02

entire abandonment of Anti Slavery
principles– I for one am not disappointed–
That letter which was equally agreeable
to both Whig and Silver Greys gave evidence
to me of the moral power of the man–
He too wants to live in Washington– and it is
the right place for him- I think Kossuth
and Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
will not fail the cause of freedom
I wish I could reckon two more as fearless
and consistent advocates– And they are
both called fanatics by men who are not
worthy to "unloose the latches of their shoes"–
Well, well, it will all come right by & by–
Miss Avery
Birth: 1833-09-01 Death: 1893-11-14
came yesterday and spent the
day with me– Henry brought home a Mr
Mrs French
x Birth: 1807-09-09  Death:   Birth: 1798  Death: 1865-01-29 
of Dunkirk to dinner– very
nice, plain folks– Mr Schoolcraft
Birth: 1804-09-22 Death: 1860-07-07
came
back last week– he remains at the National–
though he is here often– he almost always
enquires about you– It is constantly reported
(was told us by Gen Cass
Birth: 1782-10-09 Death: 1866-06-17
) that he was engaged
to be married to a Miss Porter
Unknown
of Detroit
who has died recently– The Porters were distantly
related to Mr Schoolcraft– about a year
ago the father died leaving the family
Page 4

destitute– It was the settlement of their affairs
which called Mr Schoolcraft to Detroit last
Summer– Henry has never heard him speak of
the daughter, but frequently and in high terms
of the mother– The day Kossuth was to dine
here a telegraph Message came to Henry
for Mr S– announcing the death of Miss Porter–
It was then Mr Cass told us that their engagement
was no secret in Detroit & that they were
to have been married soon– Of course we
have neither confirmation or disavowal from
him– When I saw him in Albany he was
in unusual spirits– he is now evidently
much depressed– If it is true, it is only
one more proof that good men are to
be purified by much suffering– Gen Jo
Jones
Birth: 1788 Death: 1852-07-15
was here last night– he says we may
expect Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
soon– by I do not rely upon this
as I thought that he seemed to be much
less informed on the subject of his present
situation than I did– His orders I suppose have
not yet reached him– the communication is so
indirect– it may be another month before he
comes– I am only disturbed that I get no
letter though I am in daily expectation-
Henry obtained for you Kossuths autograph
which you will find in one of these envelopes