Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 16, 1853

  • Posted on: 22 July 2019
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 16, 1853
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:jaa

student editor

Transcriber:spp:crb

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1853-01-16

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 16, 1853

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Unknown
Unknown

transcription: jaa 

revision: tap 2019-03-26

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Page 1

Washington Sunday
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Editorial Note

When there is a dating conflict within a letter, we assume that the day of the week is most likely to be correct. Therefore, we dated this letter January 16 rather than January 15.
Jan 15 th
My dear Sister
The letter which I
confidently expected this morning
did not come– I hope it is only
delayed by the snow storm of
which a rumour reaches us–
I am very anxious to see you to day
indeed every day, but to day especially
You of course read the address
of the Women of England to their
American Sisters
x

and I think with
me admired its tone & spirit.
Has it ever occurred to you what
it would be proper for us all
to do when it comes?– The
Abolitionist & womens rights women
Unknown

will act for us but are we
sure that we can join them or
it is it right for us to be silent?
I wish you would consider this
matter and send me your thoughts

[left Margin] she declined alleg saying it was unsafe
I did not hear of his illness

[top Margin] until he
was dead

[right Margin] Monday Mon. No letter yet I have concluded to defer
sending my letter to Mrs Nott
until I hear from
you– I enclose
the draft
rough – I wrote to
her because
Henry
suggested it
burn it–
Page 2
I thought of it when I first read
the address– my attention was
more particularly called to it
last evening by Charles Sumner
Birth: 1811-01-06 Death: 1874-03-11

reading to me a letter from
the Rev. Lorenzo Bacon
Birth: 1802-02-19 Death: 1881-12-24
of N. Haven
who made some suggestions which
Mr Sumner wished me to consider–
I did not think those suggestions
altogether practicable but at the
time could make none better–
I wished you were here to think
for me in which wish Mr
Sumner heartily concurred– If you
are not coming immediately will
you write– One proposition made
by Mr Bacon was, that the
women favoring a movement
meet in every large town
& consult together– Speaking of
Washington as one of the most
important– Now you know there
are no women here to meet with
except the extreme abolitionists
Page 3

which would not meet Henry’s
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10

approbation were I ever so much
disposed– I told Henry last night
that I should feel bound to sign
my name to the address written
in reply if asked– He seemed
to think that the duty would depend
upon circumstances– & that I, or you
and I alone, joining the abolitionists
would do the cause more harm
than good– Herer we differ–
What do you think?– I know if you
were living here as I am, hearing every
day accounts of un inhumanity
which often keep me awake all night,
that you would think there
was little danger of doing too
much. Still I should deprecate
any action extravagant or
unwomanly because I think
such action detrimental to any
course. I was able to give Charles
Sumner so little encouragement
about enlisting the feelings of
Page 4

the women in high place that he
went home rather desponding– yet
I know feel on reflection that I
may have been wrong– It is possible
Anti slavery may become fashionable
now the noble woman of England
are advocating it– we shall see –
In the mean time let this letter
be entre nous for the present –
I have written to day to Mrs. E Nott
Birth: 1806-09-25 Death: 1886-04-18

and Mrs Hicok
Birth: 1804 Death: 1888-05-07
– tomorrow I will
talk with Mrs. McLean
Birth: 1802 Death: 1882-01-13
but
you are worth any 40 –
I hope your letter will come tomorrow
saying you are all ready to come
I think Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
can come whenever
you are ready but wishes to avoid
as much of the party going
season as possible – when I hear from
you I will write to him– Henry & Caroline
Birth: 1834-07-25 Death: 1922-02-28

attended a party at Miss Corwin’s
Birth: 1795-07-17 Death: 1878-06-10Certainty: Possible
last
week– I made none but morning
visits– I have 2 evening engagements
for next week but doubt
my strength to fulfil them –
You saw the Scott
Birth: 1786-06-13 Death: 1866-05-29
dinner noticed –
Mr Upham
Birth: 1792-08-05 Death: 1853-01-14
is said to have died with

[right Margin] Varioloid – malignant– I offered my
services to Mrs Upham
Birth: 1795-10-10 Death: 1856-05-08
yesterday but