Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, December 8, 1857

  • Posted on: 30 June 2020
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, December 8, 1857
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:smc

student editor

Transcriber:spp:crb

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1857-12-08

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, December 8, 1857

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Washington D.C., US

transcription: smc 

revision: fdc 2020-01-15

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Page 1

Auburn Dec 8th
My dear Sister,
I was grateful for the Telegraph
wire last night which told us of
the organization of Congress– I felt more
secure in the belief that you and Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10

had arrived safely– this morning’s mail
brought more abundant cause for
thankfulness in two letters from you
two from Henry and one from Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25

It is so pleasant to know that the long
journey is accomplished without any
worse mishap than temporary illness–
Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
and Trippy have their letters
too– both much elated thereby
Kate
Birth: 1837 Death: 1878-04-08
must feel very glad to see you–
I agree with you that few women would
have remained there h as she has done–
It was her capacity for just such
emergencies that made me anxious to
to have her at Washington– She has
many noble traits of character–
Tell Henry I was not well when
Page 2

I wrote him that short letter Saturday–
I find now that I am away from you
both that I have too much talking to do
my chest and throat are constantly
sore– raw seemingly– Mary
Unknown
Servant
does
very well indeed– I attempted the
cooking but broke down after a d few
days– when I found that she could
cook much better than I– so we
changed work– she is not yet 15–
considering her want of an education is
in many respects a remarkable child–
She has bought a dress with her first
weeks wages and is now engaged in
making it– Eliza
Certainty: Possible
has a sort of motherly
care of me– she comes up every night to
see that I am properly cared for & often
stays all night–makes my fire in the
morning– Indeed we are getting along nicely
except that I am afraid of Willis
Birth: 1830
– his
heedless haste, his utter want of judgement
to say nothing of entire irresponsibility
frighten me– I am constantly fearing
some great calamity will come
Page 3

in consequence of his recklessness– or wickedness–
though I am by no means afraid of him
personally– I went to the barn to day &
found a strange buggy there, which he
had deluged the barn floor in washing–
The William St doors are not fastened though
he made a pretense of nailing them (I sent for
Judge
Birth: 1832 Death: 1870-02
to come and do it to day)– enquiring
whose the buggy was, he replied it was
one he had taken for a note– Of course I
did not believe this– Some one else has told
me it belongs to Mr Rhodes
Birth: 1834 Death: 1895-11-30Certainty: Possible
– it certainly
has no business in our barn– The old cow
and Lily seemed comfortably cared for–
as does the horse– We fail in coal
fires, I cannot make them and Willis
does not know how– his conceit prevents
his learning– The house has twice been
filled with smoke from crowding the
office stove with kindling wood– would
smaller coal do better think you?–
We are using furnace coal which he
breaks imperfectly–
Page 4

The weather is mild– yesterday the sun shone
all day– Fanny is spending a few days
with Sarah Hance
Birth: 1820-01-25 Death: 1867-06-10
– coming home at night–
I went last evening to see Mrs Miller
Unknown

she is better but still suffering– I think
she will recover– would recover sooner had
she any occupation beside thinking of herself–
I found Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
here when I came back–
she stayed until Fanny came safely from
a tableau party which was rather late–
As Willie
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
went for her with the horse
I fancied all manner of mishaps–
Fred writes that he and Anna
Birth: 1834-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
would come
up more if not for Mr Wilkesons
Birth: 1817-05-09 Death: 1889-12-02
illness–
I think he is yet in New York
Willie has been twice to Pisgah– I believe
I mentioned that Patrick
Unknown
came for coal–
did I do right to send him to Mr
Munger
Birth: 1803-06-13 Death: 1869-04-15Certainty: Possible
for a supply. He keeps himself
locked in the house with a good
fire– Nep
Birth: 1856 Death: 1859
tried to stay with him last night
but Willie thinks he would not let him in
the house– Nep came home this morning disgus-
ted with this inhospitable treatment– Fanny has
just sent for Miss Hance to come & see tableaux
this evening– she is going– Trip and I stay at
home– Trip felt very bad that he could not


[right Margin] go with me to Mrs Millers
Page 5

Love to Kate– tell her Cato
has spent 2 or 3 nights out & finally has one of
his paws hurt by fighting