Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, Jr., March 24, 1860

  • Posted on: 27 July 2016
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, Jr., March 24, 1860
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:kac

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1860-03-24

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, Jr., March 24, 1860

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1839-06-18  Death: 1920-04-29

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: kac 

revision: ekk 2015-07-07

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Page 1

Saturday [ 23rd ]
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Alternate Text

Alternate Text: 24th

My dear Son,
If you can find
Uncle Polydores
Birth: 1799-07-02 Death: 1872-04-25
bill for butter
sent in Nov. or Dec. will
you tell me the numbers
of pounds without the
weight of the firkins.
If you do not find the
bill can you tell me
how much the butter
was a lb. I can then
make a calculation as I
believe you paid about
$55.
I read in a work of
scientific discoveries a descrip-
tion of a new shoe for
horses with tender feet
Page 2

which I transcribe on the
next page. If any thing
can be made of it, it
might be of use to Fanny
 Death: 1860
.
Tell Aunty
Birth: 1803-11-01 Death: 1875-10-03
I send the
Post and A. S. Standard
today and will write
tomorrow. I was in bed
most of the day yesterday
am better today.
God bless you
Mother.
Page 3

Improved shoe for horses.
"Mr. Thomas of London has
invented a doublebottomed
shoe to obviate the necessity of
driving nails into the hoof
whereby many valuable horses
are injured.
He takes an ordinary horseshoe
and forms a groove in the part
which comes in contact with
the ground – about a quarter or 3/8ths
of an inch deep & 1/2 an inch or more
wide according to size of the shoe –
within 3/4 of an inch of each
extremity of the shoe. The groove
at the ends and toe of the shoe
is cut under. A piece of iron of
the same width & shape as the
groove, only thicker & slightly curved
upwards, is so fitted at the ends
and toe, that, by the tap of a
hammer, it is driven into the
Page 4

groove & hence into the under
cutting. The junction forms a
complete dovetail, & prevents the
removal of the inner shoe, unless
by the aid of a chisel.
When worn down the outer shoe
can be easily removed & replaced
by another, without taking the
inner shoe from the hoof.
In frosty weather the inner
shoe need only be jagged."
From the Scientific American
Page 5

William H. Seward
Auburn N. York
WASHINGTON D.C. MAR 25 1860
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Stamp

Type: postmark
Hand Shiftx

Frances Seward

Birth: 1805-09-24 Death: 1865-06-21
William H. Seward