Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Adeline Seward, May 21, 1862

  • Posted on: 22 February 2018
  • By: admin
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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Adeline Seward, May 21, 1862
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:nwh

student editor

Transcriber:spp:srr

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1862-05-21

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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Adeline Seward, May 21, 1862

action: sent

sender: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Frances Seward
Birth: 1844-12-09  Death: 1866-10-29

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: nwh 

revision: tap 2018-01-30

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Page 1

Washington May 21st 1862,
My dear Fanny,
I have just received
your letter of the 19th.
Our excursion into Virginia
was very interesting and very instruc-
tive. We saw War not in its holiday
garb, but in its stern and fearful
aspect. We saw the desolation
that follows, and the terror that
precedes its march. We saw
in the relaxation of African bondage
and the flight of bondsmen and
bondsmen with their children
how Providence brings relief to some
Page 2

out of the cries and sufferings of others
of one common race.
The voyage was an easy one
yet I found its fatigue so great
as to make rest desirable on
my return.
All the hopes and fears and
anxieties of this unhappy strife
renew themselves at this moment
and cluster about the crises
at Richmond and at Corinth.
The public most accustomed to
successes is little disturbed–
but for one, who has such respon-
sibilities as mine. There is nothing
but unwavered watchfulness.
I believe that our good
Page 3

cause will prevail, but I know
very well that it must encounter
occasional reverses – I prefer to
meet them –
Our ministers are sending
from the portraits of Majesties
and Statesmen. Anna
Birth: 1836-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
is having
them neatly framed.
You must keep back
the tulips and lilacs for me
until June. Whenever I see a
good chance to escape I shall
look in upon you –
Your affectionate father
William H. Seward.
Miss Fanny Seward.