Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 5, 1865

  • Posted on: 27 July 2016
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 5, 1865
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:kle

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1865-01-05

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 5, 1865

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: kle 

revision: ekk 2015-01-05

<>
Page 1

Thursday Jan. 5th
My dearest Sister
Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
has quinsy
An inflammation of the throat; a species of angina which renders respiration difficult • An inflammation of the fauces, especially the tonsils •
but
in a milder form than usual
less inflammation & lip pain.
The Dr
Birth: 1839Certainty: Probable
thinks suppuration
will not take place - today
will show. Her tonsil con-
tinued to enlarge yesterday.
Tuesday night Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
went, is
set out to go to Philadelphia.
I presume he was detained
on the road all night, as
the northern train did not
reach here for the snow.
He was to attend the funeral
of Mr Dallas
Birth: 1792-07-10 Death: 1864-12-31
yesterday and
that of Mr Dayton
Birth: 1807-02-17 Death: 1864-12-01
at Trenton
today, come home tomorrow.
Hunter
Birth: 1805 Death: 1886
Nicolay
Birth: 1832-02-26 Death: 1901-09-26
& Robert
Lincoln
Birth: 1843-08-01 Death: 1926-07-26
went with him,
also Donalson
Birth: 1818 Death: 1886-12-03
. I have
Page 2

never known so cold a winter
in Washington as this[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 
thus far,
the mercury this morning is
15 above zero. It is almost
impossible to keep warm in houses
built for a southern climate.
Henry went away with a bad
cold and Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
is cough-
ing. Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
's arm improves -
it is still splintered at night
and bent with great exertion
beyond a certain point. The
Dr
Unknown
thinks it will be entirely re-
stored in 6 months - it is
2 months today since it was
broken. Anna
Birth: 1836-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
had a recep-
tion yesterday morning, people
came notwithstanding the
cold. We hear the usual
preparations for evening receptions.
Mrs. Lincoln
Birth: 1818-12-13 Death: 1882-07-16
every other Monday,
Mrs. Harris
x

 

and her daughter
Birth: 1834-09-09 Death: 1883-12-23

are to have three during the
Page 3

season. I had a few lines
from Will
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
last week. I wish
much to go and see him before
I return - the road is not con-
sidered safe. Still I am not sure
but I will go, when Fanny is
better. I have no letter
from you since I wrote last
that I believe was Monday -
or Tuesday - well it is only two
days though it seems longer.
Fanny had a letter from Ellen
Birth: 1844-09-14 Death: 1920-04-14

yesterday but I think she
had not seen you, having
been sick herself.
The Dr has been here and says
Fanny's throat is much better
but speaks rather apprehen-
sively of the other tonsil.
She is sitting up now.
Fanny has your letter of N. years
day this moment - we are all
glad to think you are so well.
Page 4

You see I can say nothing
positive yet about coming
home, I will write
again in a day or two.
Fanny at her fathers sugges-
tion has written for Ellen to
come when I go home.
I hope she will as Fanny
will miss me less.
We have all enjoyed your
letter - dear Fred has just
read it - he has been
toiling two hours with his
lame arm. I can well
conceive how other arms become
stiffened when I see what it
costs to prevent that calam-
ity. I send you this extract from
the London Times which the N.
Y. papers carefully abstain from
publishing. Love to all
at home. I wish I
could see you.
Sister.