Letter from Frederick William Seward to William Henry Seward, January 5, 1867

  • Posted on: 16 December 2021
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Letter from Frederick William Seward to William Henry Seward, January 5, 1867
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:meb

student editor

Transcriber:spp:jxc

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1867-01-05

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Letter from Frederick William Seward to William Henry Seward, January 5, 1867

action: sent

sender: Frederick Seward
Birth: 1830-07-08  Death: 1915-04-25

location: Hampton Roads, VA

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Washington D.C., US

transcription: jxc 

revision: jxw 2021-07-01

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Page 1

Hampton Roads
Jan. 5th
My dear Father,
You have already
heard of the disaster to the Don,
by the Admiral's
Birth: 1801-07-05 Death: 1870-08-14
report to the
Secretary of the Navy
Birth: 1802-07-02 Death: 1878-02-11
. We have had
a rough time of it, but fortunately
are safe.
It would seem as if fate was
against our expedition, if the reason
was not so apparent, i. e., that we
Page 2

are trying to get sea service out
of vessels which are not very
well adapted to it. They are
English blockade runners, built
for a special purpose, and rather
the worse for wear. They are very
pretty little steamers for river
use or for coast expeditions
where they can choose their own
time for going from port to port,
but unfitted for a long voyage
or heavy weather, — I do not know
that any one is to blame for it
but ourselves. The Navy Department
Page 3

has given us the best that were
available, and the officers and
men have done everything that
could be done.
We are fortunate in finding
the Gettysburg here this morning.
We shall try her again with
hopes of better success, but without
any assured certainty of it.
At any rate, she is probably better
than the Don.
The Admiral has indomitable
perseverance & great fertility of
resource, and but for him we
probably should not have got through
Page 4

He is considerably bruised, but
fortunately has no bones broken, as
was at first feared. — Several [ of ]
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Reason: hole

the men were injured, but no
lives lost.
Anna
Birth: 1834-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
is up to breakfast an[ d ]
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Reason: hole

says she feels well this morning
Affectionately yours
F. W. S

[bottom Margin]
F. W. S.
Jan. 5. 1867