Letter from Benjamin Jennings Seward to Samuel Sweezey Seward, July 27, 1825

  • Posted on: 10 July 2017
  • By: admin
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Letter from Benjamin Jennings Seward to Samuel Sweezey Seward, July 27, 1825
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:obm

student editor

Transcriber:spp:lmd

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1825-07-27

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Letter from Benjamin Jennings Seward to Samuel Sweezey Seward, July 27, 1825

action: sent

sender: Benjamin Seward
Birth: 1793-08-23  Death: 1841-02-24

location:
x

receiver: Samuel Seward
Birth: 1768-12-05  Death: 1849-08-24

location: Unknown
Unknown

transcription: obm 

revision: obm 2016-11-17

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Page 1

N.Y. 27 July 1825
Dear Father
I have recently held a long
conversation with our dearly beloved Cornelia
Birth: 1805-10-29 Death: 1839-01-04

It resulted in giving me a great deal of
satisfaction, while at the same time it
gives me great anxiety — The state of her
mind — (I think I am not mistaken in it)
is, that she is now free from fetters &
embarrassments engagements & at liberty to
do as she pleases — nevertheless there is
something of the old predilection left.
With hardly a full purpose of mind, except
upon three heads — one if the Dr
Birth: 1798-11-26 Death: 1865-01-05
goes to Go
shen
x

to settle — to have nothing more to do with
him under any circumstances — another that she
will in good faith live up to the stip-
ulations of the agreement — & a third that
no offer under any circumstances could be accep-
able to her that would not include in it a
complete & unquestionable competence — There make
up a bulk of favourable circumstance upon
Page 2

which her real friends need not fear to rely
could they always have the control of every
intermediate circumstance -But here is the
intermiediate cause of apprehension — her pretended
friends may magnify the obligation she owes to
public opinion — nor will one sound talking es
tablish her beyond their control — connection
may be shaken — recantion is a work of time —
she is not now prepared to allow that she was
hasty — but yet she may without doubt be ex-
pected to see and own it, if others are kept
from her ears — but that way Geo Wickham
Birth: 1772 Death: 1845-11-16

& and his wife
 Death: 1864-02-05
talked to me when there would
lead her to conclude that the peace
ratified with Great Britain
x

might as prop-
erly be broken as her engagement — And
yet it would to my view be highly impolitic
to press a renouncement— If she goes to Orange
x


& is curtailed in her visits, she will at once
ascribe it to this — & it will create hostility &
stubbornness - If left at the mercy of others she
is gone to a certainty— Such are my views
of this matter — your better judgement may see more
Page 3

to relieve in some points & perhaps more to fear
in others than I do —
I have this day recd a letter from Dr C
enquiring very earnestly whether the agreement
has been accepted or rejected— Mentions that
Gen Dickerson
Birth: 1770-04-17 Death: 1853-10-05
had recd your letter & only
says that his mama
Birth: 1752-10-10 Death: 1827-03-01
handed it to him
speaks nothing about the opinion or effect
of it there — I answered him that it was
harvest time & no answer had been re-
ceived –––––––––––
Your unnamed correspondent
Unknown
has found
it necessary to go to New Jersey
x

for the
benefit of his health — will return about
the 20th August & I expect very likely thro’
Orange – tho he has not said so — He really
conducts himself with the utmost propiety
in this matter & the character given him
here by his friends & acquaintances, im
proves him upon our esteem at every
new enquiry — His attentions have been
(tho’ observed yet) sparing and evidently in
Page 4

subordination to some higher motive for
his conduct — Cornelia had with more than
half of earnestness invited Miss Randolph
Birth: 1788 Death: 1876
home
with her — which when he heard of it said
(not to us) that he would then come to F
x


& invite C & Eliza to Schooley Mountain — We
however thought it prudent quietly to wave
the whole matter —His politeness is ev-
idently highly esteemed & rather solicited
by C. than otherwise — If this be found
to answer it may easily be affected ––
Our institution is now fairly open.
the capital small & the business light —
—I am perfectly conscious that my
services here could be dispensed with at
this moment better perhaps than for
years to come — could I afford it I
should ask permission to go to Auburn
x


& to Buffalo
x

— I think it probable
our Jersey friend
Unknown
might be inclined to go–
Your affectionate Son
B.J. Seward