Letter from Mahlon Dickerson Canfield to Frances Miller Seward, April 11, 1839

  • Posted on: 10 March 2016
  • By: admin
xml: 
Letter from Mahlon Dickerson Canfield to Frances Miller Seward, April 11, 1839
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:keh

student editor

Transcriber:spp:dxt

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1839-04-11

In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's persons.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "pla" point to place elements in the project's places.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's staff.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's bibl.xml authority file. verical-align: super; font-size: 12px; text-decoration: underline; text-decoration: line-through; color: red;

Letter from Mahlon Dickerson Canfield to Frances Miller Seward, April 11, 1839

action: sent

sender: Mahlon Canfield
Birth: 1798-11-26  Death: 1865-01-05

location:
x

receiver: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: keh 

revision: crb 2016-02-10

<>
Page 1

Bargaintown, Apl 11th, 1839.
Dear Frances,
In answer to your very kind letter,
I am glad to say that my children
x Birth: 1832-02-20  Death: 1876-01-14  Birth: 1829-12-04  Death: 1867-10-25  Birth: 1834-07-25  Death: 1922-02-28 
are all well
and able to go out. They are very happy to find
themselves at liberty, after so long an imprisonment.
Caroline has not had the measles yet, but, as she
is entirely free from any complaint of the lungs,
(the part most apt to suffer) I hope for a favorable
issue, when she may have the disease.
The dear little creature seemed to be at the
very gates of death, when I first wrote to Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
,
and I felt as if I was not far off. I am sure
I could not have sustained the loss of that child.
To the Giver of all mercies, I am as thankful for
her restoration as I know how to feel, but it is too
little, – no part of what I would feel.
I hope that the dark cloud which has hung over me
so long is about to give place to a brighter day.
I have suffered more than you can know until
you are called to the same trials, which I pray
God long to withhold. O, they are dreadful,
heartbreaking. They change the very appearance of
the world. Nothing seems as it used to be.
What a season of happiness has been mine, and how
swiftly it has passed away. On the 18th, it will be
Page 2

12 years, since that dear, precious, confiding
woman
Birth: 1805-10-29 Death: 1839-01-04
left all for me. When I think of what
she did for my sake, and of her constant,
untiring devotedness always, I feel that I could
not have been duly grateful to her. And yet, I
could not have been very far otherwise, for we
were very, very happy. –
Be pleased to assure Mrs Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01 Death: 1875-10-03
of my sincere
respect. I would love to meet her after so
many years.
My hand is stiff and all out of condition
for writing, tho, getting well.
Very affectionately
Yours,
M. D. Canfield
P.S. I do not look for answers to all my letters. Your and
Lazette and Henry's engagements will not permit.
For the latter there is no hope under 3 years, and
perhaps longer, but I trust that your disabilities
may be removed much sooner. I shall be always
glad to hear from you, and especially to know that
you are in comfortable health. M.D.C.
Mrs Frances A. Seward