Letter from Helen Matilda Webb to Frances Miller Seward, July 14, 1849

  • Posted on: 6 October 2017
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Letter from Helen Matilda Webb to Frances Miller Seward, July 14, 1849
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:ara

student editor

Transcriber:spp:msr

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1849-07-14

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Letter from Helen Matilda Webb to Frances Miller Seward, July 14, 1849

action: sent

sender: Helen Morgan
Birth: 1827-11-30  Death: 1896-10-03

location: Mackinac Island, MI

receiver: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Florida, NY

transcription: ara 

revision: ara 2015-06-16

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Page 1

Mackinac July 14th 1849
My Dear Mrs Seward
After the kindness with which we
were recieved by you a few weeks ago, and the interest
which you seemed to feel in us I could not resist
writing you a few lines to assure you that we appre -
ciate it, and hope that it will be increased by our future
intercourse. There are none whom I value so much
now as those who loved my Mother
 Death: 1848-07-01
^and^ to whom she was
so much attached as she was to you.
We have now been staying at this place
three weeks and our time has passed very pleas -
antly. I think that Mackinac is without exception
one of the most agreable places I have ever been at. We
came here with the intention of resting a day or two
and then setting our faces homeward. But the air
here is so pure and bracing and this climate is
Mrs William Seward


[right Margin]
Hand Shiftx

Frances Seward

Birth: 1805-09-24 Death: 1865-06-21
Miss M Webb
1849
Page 2
Hand Shiftx

Helen Morgan

Birth: 1827-11-30 Death: 1896-10-03
and that father
Birth: 1802-02-02 Death: 1884-06-07
thought we could not find a
better place in which to spend the warm weather.
He feels afraid now to take us to a warmer climate
as we would feel the heat very much after staying here.
Untill this week there has been little or no company
and I have enjoyed it all the more on that account.
We have amused ourselves in walking and boating.
The scenery around is so very picturesque that all
our walks are interesting and with the exception
of a very few days last week the weather has been
such that we could walk without being incommoded
by the heat. I believe however that you are well ac-
quainted with Mackinac so I shall spare you any
further descriptions. I wish you and your little ones
x Birth: 1844-12-09  Death: 1866-10-29  Birth: 1839-06-18  Death: 1920-04-29 

would come and stay a short time. I am sure
you would find it pleasant. There are some lovely
children here who should be nice companions for
Fanny.
We paid a visit to the Sault the first week after
our arrival. We went intending to stay but one day
but the boat for which we were to have returned ran
a ground and we were kept there longer than we
either had expected or wished to be. The weather was warm
Page 3

the mosquitoes immeasurable and the accoma-
dation very poor, so we were glad to get away. The
country there is so very flat and uninteresting,
that after being rowed or rather paddled through the
rapids in a bark canoe, there is nothing left to en-
joy. Father had expected a great deal of sport from
the trout fishing, but the bites from the mosquitoes
being more numerous than those from the fish
he gave it up in despair. Our sail home however
amply compensated for any inconveniences we suf-
fered at the Sault. The Captain
Unknown
was kind enough
to leave his usual route and go twenty miles out of
his way in order to pass through the “Thirty thousand
islands” and to stop at the Ol Bruce mines. This num-
ber may seem extravagant but it is the statement of
a British surveyor
Unknown
of undoubted accuracy. The scenery
is beautiful. It far surpasses that of the St Lawrence.
I hope that you will receive this as our expression of
affection for you and excuse the performance. Louisa
Birth: 1830-12-14 Death: 1918-12-04

sends a great deal of love to yourself and little Fanny.
Give Fanny a kiss for me. Father sends love to you and
the Governor
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
to whom you must remember me also. Be -
leive me my dear Mrs Seward
yours sincerely
Matilda