Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, July 8, 1850

  • Posted on: 18 July 2019
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, July 8, 1850
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:mlb

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sts

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1850-07-08

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, July 8, 1850

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Washington D.C., US

transcription: mlb 

revision: tap 2019-02-04

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Page 1

Monday July 8th
My dear Henry,
I could not write
yesterday— that terrible ac-
cident on our rail road
had given me a thousand
apprehensions — You said in your
letter of the 2d that Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11

would be with me in a few
days and but without specifying
the day he would leave— I
of course thought it possible
that he might have been on
the road at that time and
the impossibility of getting
any information for three
days left every thing to
imagination—
Page 2

Saturday morning we learned by
Telegraph that 5 persons
had been killed by an accident
on the rail road— that
the track had broken away
in consequence of the storm—
From that time until this
morning we have not been
able to hear one word— The
Telegraph was out of order,
no mails came— not
even a newspaper—
This morning we have our first
mail — We lost the Journal
of the 5th containing your speech
but have it in the Tribune
it is just as good as I thought
it when you were here — I cannot
but smile that the Courier
Page 3

correspondent
Unknown
laments the
want of Rhetorical effect—
It is strange that neither
men or women who are brought
up in cities can tolerate
nature — Nothing is perfect
that is not in some degree
artificial — It is ^was^ the artificial
in Mr Clay’s
Birth: 1777-04-12 Death: 1852-06-29
speaking that
disappointed me and rendered
his manner less impressive
than yours—but this would
be of course imparted to my
want of taste — We are
all well at home – The
town is getting somewhat alar-
med about Cholera— There
have been three deaths which
partake of that the character
of that disease — The first
Page 4

a child
Unknown
, sick 10 hours—
then Dr Biglow
Birth: 1797-06-27 Death: 1850-07-06
about the
same time and this morning
one
 Death: 1850
of the Vanderheydens
who was in the street yesterday—
It would be strange if Cholera
should visit us now, when
we have escaped so long—
There are two or three persons
said to be suffering from
similar attacks—I shall
write daily of them –
any thing alarming—
Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
thinks she would like
to have been one of the pic-
nic party — Love to the
children
Birth: 1826 Death: 1909-08-24
— Your own
Frances