Letter from Caroline Canfield Schoolcraft Beattie to William Henry Seward, May 24, 1852

  • Posted on: 18 July 2019
  • By: admin
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Letter from Caroline Canfield Schoolcraft Beattie to William Henry Seward, May 24, 1852
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:cnk

student editor

Transcriber:spp:tap

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1852-05-24

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Letter from Caroline Canfield Schoolcraft Beattie to William Henry Seward, May 24, 1852

action: sent

sender: Caroline Beattie
Birth: 1834-07-25  Death: 1922-02-28

location: Troy, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Washington D.C., US

transcription: cnk 

revision: crb 2019-02-19

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Page 1

Troy Female Seminary
May 24th 1852,
My dear Uncle,
I have been at Albany & seen
Aunty
Birth: 1805-09-24 Death: 1865-06-21
, which was a very great pleasure;
for she has been gone away, a long time; I
saw Madame Kossuth
Birth: 1809 Death: 1865
& Mde Pulszky
Birth: 1815 Death: 1866
and
was much pleased with both, Madame
Kossuth does not appear as well as Madame
P. because she speaks so little English. I
went to hear Kossuth
Birth: 1802-09-19 Death: 1894-03-20
speak, and I was
charmed with his appearance, and had
I never hear him speak one word, I should
have admired him; and to hear him
speak gave me still greater pleasure; I think
he is a noble minded man and perfectly
unselfish; and anyone who sees him
otherwise are willfully blind, I was
very much disappointed that you did not
Page 2

get as far as Albany, for I was sure you would
be there when I heard you were in New York;
but duty called and I must hope to see
you some day. I had my letters sent
to me, whilst I was at Albany, and
yours was sent, and lost. Therefore I
do not know how to answer it;
I am desirous of going to Princeton, to
see my brother Francis
Birth: 1832-02-20 Death: 1876-01-14
graduate;
and I will go about the 15th of June
if you are willing, School closes here
the 15th of July; and it will not be
worth while for me to return after
Commencement at Princeton; My brother
Augustus
Birth: 1829-12-04 Death: 1867-10-25
will see me to New Jersey,
I suppose,
Mrs Weed
Birth: 1797 Death: 1858-07-03
is expecting soon to hear when
Mr Weed
Birth: 1797-11-15 Death: 1882-11-22
will return home, and it
seems strangely there since Harriet
Birth: 1819-02-06 Death: 1893-11-01
& her
F– are gone; Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
is great company for
Mrs Weed, and does much for her he
is perfectly devoted to his business, and
Page 3

seems happy; The children
x Birth: 1844-12-09  Death: 1866-10-29 Certainty: Possible Birth: 1839-06-18  Death: 1920-04-29 Certainty: Possible
had grown so
much that I hardly knew them, Aunty
gave me the money which you asked
her to do. I do not know about writing
a receipt, but I can write my name
at the bottom of the page & the receipt
can be written over it, Aunty writes F–
that Gus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
has gone to Norfolk, I am
anxious about the fever & chills which
he has had, I hope he will take good
care of himself, Aunty spoke something
about my going to Washington, after I
had finished my visit with my
Father
Birth: 1798-11-26 Death: 1865-01-05
, do you think I shall go? I do
not want you to trouble yourself,
Uncle, about another watch, for Mr
Bailley
Birth: 1806-12-16 Death: 1854-03-13
, I am afraid has not very
good watches, I like the watch which
I had but it kept not time, which
was the reason of my wishing to have it
returned; the watch itself was very
pretty, and I prefer it to one of those
Page 4

figured only which are not suitable for
every-day use; Will you please send me
the money, which you design for my
travelling expense? I am ^a^ very great trouble
Uncle, but I believe this is the case with
all children, I have the two speeches which
you sent me, and I shall take the first
opportunity to read them, though I have
read the one against “Intervention”
Your affectionate niece
Caroline
The Honorable
W. H. Seward
Washington
D.C.

[right Margin]
Unknown
C.C. Canfield
1852