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Almost another daughter to the Seward family, and a close friend to Fanny. Harriet never married. Her obituary in the Buffalo Evening News reads:
    "Miss Weed devoted the 75 years of lnlife entirely to the care of her father and his public work. She was his secretary, his confidante and his close friend through all the later years of his life. She had entire charge of his correspondence for years, and had an opportunity such as probably no other American woman bad to know the Inside political history of this country during the tight against slavery mid the exciting years when this State was the battlefield of the Masons and the anti-Masons, the Whigs and the Democrats, and later when the Republican party. whose cause Mr Weed espoused, sprung into existence and gained control of the State. Miss Weed was educated in Albany and began to help her father in the thirties. As his secretary she became acquainted with public affairs and with many of the most prominent men in public life. During the year preceding the war, Mr Weed's practical, political wisdom made him one of the foremost fighters against slavery. All these years Miss Weed was at her father's side, taking charge of his extensive correspondence, filing and indexing his letters and documents, and writing at his dictation his most confidential communications. Mrs. Weed died in 1858, and Miss Weed was thenceforth her father's support in his domestic affairs as well as in his study. She had charge of the management of the house, which was almost as public as a hotel, and constantly entertained his friends, including Presidents. Senators, Governors, party leaders and other prominent men. Miss Weed accompanied her father abroad when he was sent by President Lincoln in company with General Winfield Scott. Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine to visit Great Britain and France and enlighten public opinion there upon the nature of the rebellion and the issues involved. Mr. Weed, after exercising considerable diplomatic skill, succeeded in obtaining an interview with the Emperor Napoleon of France, when he dissuaded him from joining England in raising the blockade of the Southern ports of the United States. Mr. Weed cordially supported President Lincoln, for a second term. He was practically out of public life before Gen Grant was nominated. He continued until his death, in 1882, to write comments on political and social topics of the day. Mr Weed had begun an autobiography which be left unfinished. Miss Weed completed the work and it was published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. Since then Miss Weed has devoted her life to doing good."

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Biography and Citation Information:
Biography: 
Almost another daughter to the Seward family, and a close friend to Fanny. Harriet never married. Her obituary in the Buffalo Evening News reads:
    "Miss Weed devoted the 75 years of lnlife entirely to the care of her father and his public work. She was his secretary, his confidante and his close friend through all the later years of his life. She had entire charge of his correspondence for years, and had an opportunity such as probably no other American woman bad to know the Inside political history of this country during the tight against slavery mid the exciting years when this State was the battlefield of the Masons and the anti-Masons, the Whigs and the Democrats, and later when the Republican party. whose cause Mr Weed espoused, sprung into existence and gained control of the State. Miss Weed was educated in Albany and began to help her father in the thirties. As his secretary she became acquainted with public affairs and with many of the most prominent men in public life. During the year preceding the war, Mr Weed's practical, political wisdom made him one of the foremost fighters against slavery. All these years Miss Weed was at her father's side, taking charge of his extensive correspondence, filing and indexing his letters and documents, and writing at his dictation his most confidential communications. Mrs. Weed died in 1858, and Miss Weed was thenceforth her father's support in his domestic affairs as well as in his study. She had charge of the management of the house, which was almost as public as a hotel, and constantly entertained his friends, including Presidents. Senators, Governors, party leaders and other prominent men. Miss Weed accompanied her father abroad when he was sent by President Lincoln in company with General Winfield Scott. Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine to visit Great Britain and France and enlighten public opinion there upon the nature of the rebellion and the issues involved. Mr. Weed, after exercising considerable diplomatic skill, succeeded in obtaining an interview with the Emperor Napoleon of France, when he dissuaded him from joining England in raising the blockade of the Southern ports of the United States. Mr. Weed cordially supported President Lincoln, for a second term. He was practically out of public life before Gen Grant was nominated. He continued until his death, in 1882, to write comments on political and social topics of the day. Mr Weed had begun an autobiography which be left unfinished. Miss Weed completed the work and it was published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. Since then Miss Weed has devoted her life to doing good."
Citation Notes: 
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=129380376
Citation for Birth Info:
Citation Notes: 
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=129380376
Citation for Death Info:
Citation Type: 
Website
Citation URL: 
http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2011/11/lost-1849-thurlow-weed-house-no-12-west.html
Website Viewing Date: 
Thursday, July 10, 2014 - 03:15
Author(s) or Editor(s): 
kac