Letter from Lazette Miller Worden to Sarah D. Hance, January 9, 1857

  • Posted on: 30 June 2020
  • By: admin
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Letter from Lazette Miller Worden to Sarah D. Hance, January 9, 1857
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:smc

student editor

Transcriber:spp:crb

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1857-01-09

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Letter from Lazette Miller Worden to Sarah D. Hance, January 9, 1857

action: sent

sender: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: Sarah Hance
Birth: 1820-01-25  Death: 1867-06-10

location: Unknown
Unknown

transcription: smc 

revision: fdc 2020-01-31

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Page 1

Auburn, January 9th
My dear Sarah
I am alone this af-
ternoon– Bennett
Birth: 1811Certainty: Possible
having merci-
fully left me for a few hours–
If you were not five hundred
miles away I would ask you to
come in my room & tell me
all you have seen since we
parted– Your account of your
journey to Washington reminds
me of my first visit there–
Seven years this Winter– how
many changes have taken place
Since then– Of those who wel–
comed me on my arrival,
one was poor Wilder
Birth: 1822 Death: 1855-04-29
in the
strength of youth & manhood–
–how little I then thought he
would go before me to “the spirit
land”– But he is happy in a
Page 2

better world– We are having
what the ancient people used
to call an “old fashioned winter
–not so intensely cold as it was
last season but steady &
unchanging– In writing do I
so much discover my own
increasing age as in my dread
of this season of the year–
Years past cold weather &
snow and long evenings were
only suggestive of fun & frolic
& sleigh rides– now I have
much trouble in keeping my
self warm while I sit by
a hot stove knitting my grand
son
Birth: 1854-02 Death: 1931-05-23
stockings– I have just
finished reading Dr. Kane’s
Birth: 1820-02-12 Death: 1857-02-16
second
Expeditions
Author: Elisha Kent Kane Publisher: Childs & Peterson Place of Publication:Philadelphia Date: 1856
What a record
it is of peril & privation & perse-
verance & courage– And how
sad to think he is now dying
from the effects of these hardships–
The last steamer–you have no –
Page 3

doubt noticed – brings intelligence
of his hopeless illness at one of
the W. India Islands – his life has been
spared long enough to vindicate
his course– a boon which he
evidently desired with a nervous
apprehension that he might other-
wise be misunderstood–
I have read today the Rev. A.D.
Mayo's
Birth: 1823-01-31 Death: 1907-04-08
lecture on "The Construc-
tion of the American Household"
have you noticed the course of
lectures delivered by him & assorted
in the Albany Evening Journal?–
They are all admirable but
I think this & the one entitled
The "Industrial Sphere of Woman"
are calculated to do a vast
amount of good– Would that
women were all wise enough
to read them – & adopt some
of the good advice they give–
Mr. Baker
Birth: 1816-03-16 Death: 1887-10-02
– a friend of mine
Page 4

from Albany– tells me he (Mr. Mayo)
lectures to immense audiences–
the one half ^of those^ who wish to hear
them cannot be accommodated in
any public room in the City–
You would laugh to see me & my
family of animals this afternoon
I am sitting in the kitchen that
being the most comfortable place
in the house– & the cats & dogs
are disposed in a fanciful
manner around me – Nep
Birth: 1856 Death: 1859
– being
an out door dog is obliged to
be the circumference of the cir–
cle – the stove is so hot – & the cats
with every variety of fur "Shade
off" from him– the Canary is hang -
ing over my head presenting a
tempting lunch for our "Wise cat"
Minz
– It is getting dark & I am
expecting Bennett any moment–
after tea Trip
Birth: 1851-06-13 Death: 1862
& I are going
out to look at the stars which
Page 5

just at this sea-
son are very interesting– Have you
yet visited the
Observatory? twice enough yet–
Is not my grandson amazing?–
precious Frank! how I want to see him
Page 6

This is a poor letter for your good letter–
but write again & I will try to be more
interesting– Very affectionately yours. L. M. Worden
Page 7

Miss Hance