Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, April 13, 1865

  • Posted on: 27 July 2016
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, April 13, 1865
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:kac

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1865-04-13

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, April 13, 1865

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: kac 

revision: ekk 2015-06-24

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Page 1

Thursday April 13th
My dearest Sister
Another disturbed
and exhausting night.
Since 2 oclock at which
time I took charge of Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10

he has hardly spoken a
rational word. His face
shoulders and foot all
seemed to give him pain.
He is now at 11 oclock
quiet and sitting in a
chair. Anna
Birth: 1836-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
is at his
request reading the morning
paper, on which he makes
no comment. He has
Page 2

also taken some coffee but
no other nourishment.
Yesterday he was composed
and talked with more
ease than heretofore - he
does not complain of the
wire on his teeth as he
did of the bandages.
In reply to your message
he said "tell her with
my love, that I hope
to be able to go and see
her before long, with
less difficulty than
she can come to me."
He was perfectly rational
all day and when I left
him to go to bed in the
evening. After I left
Page 3

the Dr
Unknown
's were all here and
gave him some medicine
to quiet his nerves, which
obviously had a contrary
effect. I shall insist
that he takes nothing
tonight.
Your own
Sister