Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, November 22, 1837

  • Posted on: 10 March 2016
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, November 22, 1837
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:crb

student editor

Transcriber:spp:keh

Distributor:Seward Family Papers Project

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1837-11-22

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, November 22, 1837

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: crb 

revision: crb 2015-10-20

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Page 1

Wednesday afternoon
My dear sister,
Two days have gone by when
I intended to write but have not been able
I should write immediately to tell you how near
we came losing our dear little Freddy
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
. Friday afternoon
he was out riding on the pony, his Grandpa
Birth: 1772-04-11 Death: 1851-11-13
was
directing the movements - he came into the house
for a moment leaving Augustus
Birth: 1820-05-18 Death: 1889-05-08
with Freddy directing
him to lead the horse down to the gate and let
him return himself he (Augustus) keeping before
him to prevent his going too fast. They went down to the
gate safely but returning the pony slipped one side
of Augustus and out set off for for the barn at full speed
Frederick fell, his foot became entangled in the stirrup
and in this way he was dragged from the garden
gate to the corner of the woodhouse. Peter happened
to be at the time picking up an armfull of wood
he was alarmed by Fredericks' screams and seeing his
danger sprang and caught the horse around the
neck - the sudden check unloosened Fredericks foot
from the stirrup and he fell to the ground
directly under the foot of the horse an overruling
Providence alone protected him in this season of peril,
the horse passed on. Peter took up our little boy
(who had ceased his cries) supposing him dead but
though somewhat bruised he was not seriously injured
one of the horses hoofs struck the side of his head
Page 2

but the contusion was so slight that we do not apprehend
any bad consequences - he was the next day able to
play about as usual. I was so overwhelmed with
a sense of the great mercy that had been shown
us that it was a long time before I heard or
understood all the particulars. Peter truly said
that God's blessing was on the child or he could
not have saved him. We all feel indebted to
Peter for the presence of mind which he exhibited
had he permitted the horse to pass him it seems
as if Fredericks destruction must have inevitably
followed. Augustus fell in endeavoring to overtake
the horse and sprained his wrist slightly - nothing
serious. I can scarcely think it all over now
without a shudder. Poor Freddy I think has lost
the little relish he had for riding on horseback.
All this I wrote to Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
Sunday – the same day
I received a letter from him saying he had
arrived at Westfield Monday night at 10 oclock
with a violent inflammation of the face produced by
having a tooth insercited at Buffalo, he had the
tooth extracted and was better- found all well at
Westfield. I have not told you my experience
with tooth ache. Sunday night I was kept awake
and Monday sent for Ball
Unknown
and had my tooth ex-
tracted when lo it was a sound tooth with the
exception of some fielling which I supposed must have
come out before the filling remained firm and there
was no place where the nerve could be exposed - so that
the pain was either the effect of a cold or it was not
that tooth which ached. The tooth was so good
Page 3

that I proposed replacing which was done with very
little pain - for some hours I felt very well but
presently my face began to swell and pain me my
teeth and gums became very sore and finally I had
about as uncomfortable a night as the one previous.
After Breakfast I sent for D. Mosier - after due
consultation I had the tooth again extracted with
turnkeys the gums by this time having swollen
so much as to render it impossible to take it
out in any other way - the 2d operation was
quite as painful as the first - so you see
Henry and I had cause for sympathy could we
have known each others situation. I observed the
aurora Tuesday it very much resembled that of
last February. I am glad you have a stove in your
parlour it is the only way to be comfortable. Mrs
Hills
Birth: 1796 Death: 1863-04-22
has actually come to the conclusion that it is
preferable to freezing as she has done heretofore and has
one of Mott's
Birth: 1773-06-25 Death: 1866-01-25
stoves in her parlour. I think all
the people who are going to Congress act pretty much
alike, it undoubtedly requires more strength of mind
to hear prosperity than adversity gracefully.
Serene
Birth: 1802
is to go on Monday. Mrs F.
 Death: 1848-03-10
has gone to Watertown
Mrs Wright
Birth: 1795 Death: 1852
was here to Tuesday before I received your letter
I was sorry for the message would have gratified her
they stayed all night at the American but I could not
prevail on her to remain with me. I think it probable
I shall see her again, she said she had not been well this
fall. I remember Miss Parish
Unknown
would like very much
to hear her christian name - it helps wonderfully to refresh the
memory - have we not had some delightfully warm days. Your own sis Frances.

[right Margin] I have not yet told you why I could not
write before but it is dark now and I must
write again.

Page 4

I think I will send the green dress I did not think about Fanny
wanting a new cloak again this winter I supposed it was to
be made into a pelisse
Originally a furred robe or coat but is now given to a silk coat or habit worn by ladies •
- it will certainly be no waste to put it
in a cloak. I will send it the first day opportunity.
Mrs Alvah Worden
Canandaigua
AUBURN N.Y.
NOV 24
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Stamp

Type: postmark