Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, December 16, 1837

  • Posted on: 10 March 2016
  • By: admin
xml: 
Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, December 16, 1837
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:jds

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1837-12-16

In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's persons.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "pla" point to place elements in the project's places.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's staff.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's bibl.xml authority file. verical-align: super; font-size: 12px; text-decoration: underline; text-decoration: line-through; color: red;

Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, December 16, 1837

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Westfield, NY

transcription: jds 

revision: ekk 2015-06-09

<>
Page 1

Auburn Dec 16th 1837
My dear Henry
I have before me your last Sunday's
letter also one written Wednesday. I think the roads must
be improving as the latter came from Westfield in three
days. Our winter seems to have commenced but not
with the severity of the last three or four years- our
Thermometer has not yet fallen below 20. I think Jennings
Birth: 1793-08-23 Death: 1841-02-24

has Farenheits will you notice it some of the coldest
mornings if it is situated similarly to ours- which is at
present in the south room entry that being about the
coldest place in the house. So I may expect you
in about three weeks. I have been thinking of meeting
you at Canandaigua if you think it expedient, my visit
has been deferred until this time waiting for snow-
there is not sufficient sleighing yet but it snows
a little every day. I thought of getting a sleigh for
Nicholas
Birth: 1801-12-24 Death: 1893
to take me to Waterloo when he can return
and I will remain all night with Mrs Fosgate
 Death: 1848-03-10
- the
stage must get along there about breakfast time.
There is none leaves here except in the evening or
very early in the morning both of which would be
unpleasant. My stay at Canandaigua will be along a week
so if you can let me know about what time you
will leave Westfield, and approve of my plan, I will
arrange it so as to meet you there- if you write imme-
diately I shall receive your answer by Christmas. The little
boys
x Birth: 1830-07-08  Death: 1915-04-25  Birth: 1826-10-01  Death: 1876-09-11 
will both accompany me. Augustus is better than
he has been though his head is not entirely well.
I received a letter from Lazette
Birth: 1803-11-01 Death: 1875-10-03
yesterday- all as well
as usual.
Page 2

The lines you sent me were very sweet and expressive- No one
but those who have had like trials can know how much
I find every day to recal our precious babe
Birth: 1836-08-25 Death: 1837-01-14
to my memory – the
bandbox
A slight paper box for bands, caps, bonnets, muffs, or other light articles •
containing her little wardrobe still stands at the foot
of my bed. I have looked forward with dread to the season of
the year which is approaching- it brings all back so forcibly
the time when the fatal disease was communicated- the Happy
New Year day when I received the congratulations of my
friends and talked with pride of our new treasure, little
imagining that even then that horrid disease was pervading
her system- the ten dreadful days and nights when I
watched its progress with agony not to be described- the
closing scene-all-all are before me as if it were but
yesterday. Yes it is the blessed hope of a reunion with
those that have departed that affords the only consolation.
If I required other proof of a future existence than the
divine revelation one of the most convincing would
be ^the^ fond imaginings that are never realized the yearning
desire for happiness which is never attained. But dearest
you must not think I am desponding. I am cheerful and content
when I re look on the numerous blessings which surround me
I should be ungrateful could I be otherwise. How thankful
I feel that we have all enjoyed tolerable health through this
separation. We are again without a maid in the kitchen
the last girl or old maid was too fiery a temper
to answer our purpose- after she had spent one week in wran
gling I dismissed her. Maria
Unknown
had commenced going to school
but I must keep her at home until we find another girl
I shall try this time for a Yankee the Irish have exhausted
my patience. I must except Catherine
Unknown
who was very sweet
tempered and obliging. I have not been to church to day.
I had forgotten that I was to write in Fred's letter so I must
divide my paper. I asked him why he put Hon. at the bottom
of his letter he says because other people do. It is so dark
I must conclude my letter without writing half I intended your own
Frances–