Letter from Lazette Miller Worden to William Henry Seward, December 3, 1837

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Letter from Lazette Miller Worden to William Henry Seward, December 3, 1837
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:sss

student editor

Transcriber:spp:crb

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1837-12-03

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Letter from Lazette Miller Worden to William Henry Seward, December 3, 1837

action: sent

sender: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Westfield, NY

transcription: sss 

revision: crb 2016-06-29

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Page 1

Sunday Evening
My dear Brother,
I have just finished a letter to Fanny
Birth: 1805-09-24 Death: 1865-06-21
and shall
think my days “labour of love” incomplete if I do not write
to you also. I received your kind letter last Wednesday
and took much reproach to myself that I had again to be
reminded of my promise to write you. It was not my dear
brother that I was unmindful of you, for there is not an hour
in the day that your goodness to me is not remembered with
all a sister’s love, but my illness constantly incapacitates me for
my exertion either of mind or body. I am happy to hear you
are enjoying yourself so quietly at Westfield – it must be pleasant
indeed to have some repose after such a world of excitement
as you have passed through for a few months back.
The whigs generally are determined not to rest at all. In
New York particularly they are really making themselves quite
ridiculous. Granger
Birth: 1792-12-01 Death: 1868-08-31
has just returned and I should think from
what I can make of him as he walks along he has lost none
of the good opinion he had of himself before he went away
Worden
Birth: 1797-03-06 Death: 1856-02-16
says he is in high spirits. The Sibleys
x Birth: 1802-01-29  Death: 1877-05-21  Birth: 1796-11-06  Death: 1852-09-08 
have been absent several
weeks – but their absence is no loss to me – I never saw any of the family
after that Evening I was there with you. They remained in N. York
several days on their way down which gave Sibley an opportunity
to attend the great dinner to the great men. Which is represented
as being a very splendid affair.
Page 2

December 6 – This letter has to my shame be it said laid
on the table two whole days unfinished. I received a letter
from Fanny yesterday – nothing new at home – all well
and at the time she wrote all pretty much engaged now.
The weather has been delightful for the last three or four days
the sun shone as brightly and the air was more like the month
of June than December – but to day it is cold very cold though
no appearance of snow. I am anxiously waiting for sleighing
that Fanny and the boys
x Birth: 1830-07-08  Death: 1915-04-25  Birth: 1826-10-01  Death: 1876-09-11 
can come out. Today we received
the Albany Journal giving an account of the Whig celebration
at Fredonia – on paper it appears to be the most sensible thing
of the kind that has been enacted – and yours the only sensible
speech that has been made Here they did not pretend to give any
manifestations of joy – they probably knew their inability to acquit
themselves in a manner any way imposing and wisely refrained from
the attempt. Holly
Birth: 1779-04-20 Death: 1841-03-04
wrote what he intended to be ^two^ very vigorous
editorial articles and that with a meeting constituted the whole
of what they said and did here. I am living very much alone
particularly as the cold weather prevents my going ^out^ at all
I occasionally see my nearest neighbours and the Sanborne’s
Unknown

this constitutes my society – but I am content. Fan
Birth: 1826 Death: 1909-08-24
. goes to
school and grows tall and wild daily – she sends much
love to her Uncle. I am quite as well now as when you were here
and have an excellent girl
Unknown
in my kitchen – two very essential items
in the catalogue of ones comforts. Do remember me kindly
to your good brother
Birth: 1793-08-23 Death: 1841-02-24
and the ladies
Birth: 1794-07-23 Death: 1839-10-28
of his household.
I wish also that you would make ^my^ respects acceptable to Mr.
Hughes
Unknown
– I do not know as he will remember me – but I shall
not soon forget him nor his good sermons. If you will write
again I will not delay answering it so long
Yours Affectionately
Lazette
Page 3

William H. Seward
Westfield
Chautauqua Co.
NY
Canandaigua NYDEC 7
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Stamp

Type: postmark

Hand Shiftx

William Seward

Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
Lazette
Dec. 12. 1837