Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 26, 1840

  • Posted on: 4 October 2017
  • By: admin
xml: 
Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 26, 1840
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:cnk

student editor

Transcriber:spp:srr

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1840-01-26

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 26, 1840

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Albany, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: cnk 

revision: crb 2015-06-16

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Page 1

Tuesday Jan 26th 1840
My dearest Sister,
A whole week has passed by without
my writing you a letter and to day your second letter
came just as I was going to Church – Monday morning was
the time Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
purposed leaving for Auburn but he conclu-
ded to wait until Tuesday that he might have the
protection of James Horner
Birth: 1804 Death: 1874-06-12
who was to leave at that time
for another journey to the west – Tuesday morning after
Gus had made himself ready to set off, word came
that Mr Horner would not leave that morning – I
knew dear Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
was expecting him and would be
very anxious if he did not come so I advised his
going alone a course which he seemed to prefer him-
self – his Pa
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
accompanied him to the depot but found
no acquaintance to whom he might entrust him – so
he went alone – I expected a letter as early as Thursday
and since that time have felt very anxious about
him – no letter came until this morning – he
was detained on the road by a fall of snow
which obstructed the rail road between Syracuse
and Auburn, so that he did not reach home until
Wednesday morning – Clara wrote immediately but
somehow the letter was detained and only came this
morning in company with yours and one from Jennings
Birth: 1793-08-23 Death: 1841-02-24

Clara is very glad to have Augustus at home again – She
promises to come and see me next Spring – My cold
keeps me at home nine or ten days about half sick

[top Margin] Blatchford
Birth: 1820-03-09 Death: 1893-07-07
will send a message in pamphlet form –

Page 2

but I was so well Wednesday that I had no apology for
not fulfiling my promise to Mrs Spencer
Birth: 1789-02-23 Death: 1868-10-10
to attend her
soiree – it was a bitter cold night as you will prob-
ably remember – Henry went with me – Blatchford was
sick and could not go – we did not get there until
nearly nine – detained by men – men – men – found her
two [ lagre ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: large
drawing rooms well filled – the more juvenile
part of the company were dancing to the notes of the piano
played by Mrs Dix
Birth: 1810 Death: 1884Certainty: Possible
– The evening passed off much as
usual – I was looked at as a curiosity it being my
first appearance in public – cake lemonade wine and
ice cream were passed round in the course of the evening
which is the usual entertainment for soiree’s – there
are to be 3 more 2 in February one in March —
Our first dinner comes on Tuesday – Mrs. Johnson
Unknown
is to cook
here two days – one day pastry and Gellies the next day
meats &c – how much I wish they were all over – it is
decided that I am to see company two evenings – no particular
invitation to be given — What shall I call them – "At Home[ s ]
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Supplied

Reason: 

"Levee's"? how I do wish you could come first — The ladies here seem
to think it will be a dreadful affair for me to entertain company
without any other lady – I do not know but I shall be obliged
to hire some one for the occasion – I can think of no one I want
but you or Mrs Cary
Birth: 1787-08-11 Death: 1863-06-22
– if there is any prospect of your coming
I will defer these affairs and think I shall at all events until
the dinners are over at least the greater part of them — I never
remember colder weather than we have had this winter – The
applications for assistance increase daily – there must be a
great amount of suffering — Your "boy" disclaims any dimin-
ution of or division of the great admiration and affection
which he has so often expressed for yourself – The idea was
very preposterous that So so uninteresting a personage as I
could supersede one so much more attractive – We have
great pleasure in reading your letters together (that is when
I choose to show them) – He has not yet fallen in love with Miss
Thompson
Unknown
– I am not inclined to think he will – she seems
an amiable
Worthy of love; deserving of affection; lovely; loveable • Pretending or showing love •
little girl but I should not think with sufficient
strength of character to interest one of taste and feelings so mature
as his – I have seen her but twice – at the soiree she appeared
not so well as when she called – a little embarrassed perhaps, but I
can judge more fairly next time.