Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, March 20, 1849

  • Posted on: 5 December 2018
  • By: admin
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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, March 20, 1849
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:maf

student editor

Transcriber:spp:csh

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1849-03-20

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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, March 20, 1849

action: sent

sender: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: maf 

revision: tap 2018-11-01

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Page 1

Washington March 20 1849.
My Dearest Frances
Here is a nice affair –
Mysterious hints have been given out for four
or five days that the proprietor
Certainty: Possible
of the Hotel
had absconded, and that this great es-
tablishment was to be closed by the Sheriff.
This morning there appeared on the doors
a placard requiring guests to leave the
house to day. I refused to go – all the
rest have withdrawn and I am here in the
great carnarium all alone – I have
stipulated with servants to bring me my
meals and warm my room and I shall
remain until the close of the session of
the Senate –
We were in Executive (secret) session all
day, The Loco Focos cut off the head
of the Whig nominee
Birth: 1815-09-08 Death: 1903-04-22
for governor of Minnesota
I immediately set about procuring that
appointment for John C. Clark
Birth: 1793-01-14 Death: 1852-10-25
– The
Page 2

Vice President
Birth: 1800-01-07 Death: 1874-03-08
on the other hand laid siege
to the State Department to procure that
office for the partner in his office, Mr
Hall
Birth: 1810-03-28 Death: 1874-03-03
of Buffalo - He was denied ad-
mission - He has sunk so low from his
commited nepotism and selfishness that
the Departments close their doors against
him. Could ever a more revengeful
party then I ask now than this? He
has not yet the least idea of the
descent he has made - Could any
self complacency exceed this? I may
not get Clark appointed – for there are
other interests in other states – and this
President
Birth: 1784-11-24 Death: 1850-07-09
does not know the reputation
of Clark, but I shall not be the man
for insisting on it.
I dined to day with Mr. Webster
Birth: 1782-01-18 Death: 1852-10-24

Mrs W.
Birth: 1797-09-28 Death: 1882-02-26
was not at table, Her niece
Birth: 1834-06-14 Death: 1883-04-04Certainty: Probable

and Miss Fletcher
Unknown
were – they both
appeared very beautiful, and the party
Page 3

was very pleasant. It consisted of these
Ladies, Mr. Dawson
Birth: 1798-01-04 Death: 1856-05-05
, Ed. Curtis
Birth: 1801-10-25 Death: 1856-08-02

James Monroe
Birth: 1799-09-10 Death: 1870-09-07
and Schoolcraft
Birth: 1804-09-22 Death: 1860-07-07
of Albany
Mr Webster without the effacing of
Mr Bradish
Birth: 1783-09-15 Death: 1863-08-30
is as fastidious in
his desires, his viands, and his wines
as the Correspondent of Ibahim Pacha
Birth: 1789 Death: 1848-11-17

Every thing was of the best, and served
in the very nicest manner – The conversa-
tion was not particularly intellectual
or elevated – But it was a free, social
gathering.
I believe I have established the
best relations with the leading mem-
bers of the Senate of both parties.
I am particularly at ease with Col
Benton
Birth: 1782-03-14 Death: 1858-04-10
as well as Mr. Webster –
I have spoken only the twice that I
have mentioned, and shall not claim the
floor again –
Page 4

Mr Webster satisfied me to night that
I was right in insisting on keeping
house – so it remains for you to come
here and provide a place and
continue the comforts of it for me.
I am, dearest Frances,
ever your own
Henry.