Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February, 1856

  • Posted on: 29 June 2020
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February, 1856
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:jxm

student editor

Transcriber:spp:smc

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1856-02

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February, 1856

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: jxm 

revision: ska 2019-11-11

<>

Page 1

Washington Friday night–
My dear Sister,
Though I think of you constantly
I could not write again until I
knew something more of your present
situation– I have to night Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
's
letter from Canandaigua saying the
funeral was to take place Wednesday
afternoon– this was as I supposed
I have been continually fancying how,
and when, without any certain
knowledge– How glad I am Aunt
Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
is with you– I suppose Henry
must have left you Thursday as
he is expected here tomorrow – I have
no doubt that you will be ill when
all have gone and the house is quiet
once more– Clarence
Birth: 1828-10-07 Death: 1897-07-24
and his
family
x Birth: 1852-02-26  Death: 1927-04-04  Birth: 1828-05-22  Death: 1906-12-09 
left us yesterday– we miss
Allie's foot steps and chatter
Page 2

Anna
Birth: 1836-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
and Frances
Unknown
will not stay long
after Henry returns– I have been
out yesterday and today after
being confined to the house eight weeks–
the air is beneficial– the sunshine
bright and warm– Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
has looked
up some little
Unknown in the neighborhood
and had them with her this afternoon.
She has been two or three times a
week to see Mrs. Fowler
Unknown
a widow
woman in the neighborhood whose
husband is dead leaving her with Birth:   Death:   to support– in which under-
taking Fanny is trying to assist her
Mrs. Fowler keeps a little store of all
kind of things for sale– Fanny dresses
dolls, buys cakes, assists in putting
things in order, and finally took the
youngest boy for as a scholar– her
little brain is continually planning some
new mode of helping Mrs. Fowler.
Louisa Weightman
Birth: 1843-02-20 Death: 1932-12-23
comes occasionally
Page 3

but her exceeding rudeness begins to make
her less attractive to Fanny–
Saturday evening– We looked confidently for
Henry to night but he does not come–
I will close my letter without hearing
more from you–Will it not be
possible for you all to come here
before I go home? –think of it–
I have always doubted spending another
Winter here but perhaps without reason–
Lieutenant Woodhull
Birth: 1813-04-02 Death: 1863-02-19
– now Captain
Woodhull has inherited the fortune he
expected from his Uncle– talks of
resigning his commission in the Navy–
his Uncle Maxwell
Unknown
died a short
time ago– Capt. Woodhull is
now in New York I shall hope
to hear from you tomorrow– love
to Frances
Birth: 1826-12-12 Death: 1909-08-24
– your own Sister –
All the children send love–