Letter from Frances Alvah Worden to Lazette Miller Worden, January 2, 1863

  • Posted on: 22 February 2018
  • By: admin
xml: 
Letter from Frances Alvah Worden to Lazette Miller Worden, January 2, 1863
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:srr

student editor

Transcriber:spp:csh

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1863-01-02

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Letter from Frances Alvah Worden to Lazette Miller Worden, January 2, 1863

action: sent

sender: Frances Chesebro
Birth: 1826  Death: 1909-08-24

location:
Unknown

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Washington D.C., US

transcription: srr 

revision: tap 2018-02-06

<>
Page 1

Jan 2d 1863
Dear Mother
I received your welcome
letter this morning,
it has come more
rapidly than letters
usually – do – I shall
reserve all your
Washington letters.
So please date them
The pleasure of your
journey from Philadelphia
on was a compen-
sation for the first
days discomfort. It is
a tedious disagreeable
ride from anywhere
to New York and there
is no hotel that
is comfortable –
Frank
Birth: 1854-02 Death: 1931-05-23
thinks the
night must have been

[top Margin]
I write too, to hear
about New Years. Frank


[left Margin]
Would occupy him with Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11Certainty: Possible

Page 2

the prettiest part of
the journey, hence
you could see the
camps. Poor Frank
is sick today. better
than yesterday. A cold
& disagreement of the
stomach. today he
is eating roast apple &
dry toast without butter –
and looking and
pictures and being
read too. housing up
does not agree with
him, and I dread
the long cold Winter
is yet to come before
Spring. four months
I think I am very
foolish even to try
staying here through the
winter – Frank ate
cake & candy a few
Page 3

times between Christmas
and Newyears. and
a cold, made him
bilious – Mary Beele
Unknown

& Paten
Unknown
passed
Newyear day with me –
We had trusty calls –
mostly older married
men. Franks cake
graced the center of
a table. In the
evening we had a
little company dances
& played cards – Now
I settle down to winter.
There is no gaiety here
and little sociability
except what I have
in mine own house.
George Gorham
Birth: 1837-05-25 Death: 1906-06-02
& his
wife
Birth: 1804-12-21 Death: 1893-08
are here pre-
paratory to going
to going to some warm
Page 4

climate for the winter
she is very low I
judge. Henry
Birth: 1822-02-03 Death: 1888-11-24
called
I have not been out
in some days avoiding
the snow. Frank is
asking so many questions
about books that I
must go amuse him
At present he is deep in
[ Geogoly ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: Geology
Margaret
Unknown
is here
for a week serving.
Henry goes Monday to
Albany. Court of Appeals
I hoped Serene Bridsall
Birth: 1802

would have been here
but she could not
come. Is quite sick
Frank sends his love
home to all. I want to
hear from Jennie
Birth: 1839-11-18 Death: 1913-11-09
&
baby
Birth: 1862-09-11 Death: 1921-10-05
in camp.

[top Margin]
must have been a novelty


[left Margin]
– but babys are every where


[right Margin]
The Army loses ground with a