Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February 24, 1841

  • Posted on: 23 June 2020
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February 24, 1841
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:cnk

student editor

Transcriber:spp:msf

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1841-02-24

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February 24, 1841

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Albany, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: cnk 

revision: fdc 2019-09-30

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Page 1

Wednesday evening
My dear Sister, I wrote to you yesterday or Monday that
Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
was better, he has had a relapse since and was so
ill yesterday that I had made up my mind to write for
you or Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
to come down immediately – the afternoon brought
symptoms a little more favourable but he is still very sick
and so weak that I find it difficult to take care of him –
he has been cupped twice since I wrote and has a
diarrhea constantly which is reducing his strength very fast –
it is impossible to check this without increasing his fever
and the medicines proper to subdue the fever increase
the diarrhea – he is some part of the time delireous –
Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
watched with him last night – I sleep in the trundle
bed and am up frequently – I spend my whole time in
the room as he seems very unwilling to have me gone –
Worden
Birth: 1797-03-06 Death: 1856-02-16
was here again this afternoon but said nothing about
going to Auburn – I received your Sunday's letter last evening
Jennings
Birth: 1793-08-23 Death: 1841-02-24
does not come yet – I regret that their
Birth: 1794-07-23 Death: 1839-10-28Certainty: Possible
visit
is to be made just at this time – we expect them every
stage – I shall not send this letter to night but will
write more in the morning
Page 2

Thursday afternoon Friday afternoon. O my dear Sister I have had
a dreadful day. my precious child is so low that
I am many times fearful he will not survive this week –
I endeavour to trust and hope all will be right but
these are terrible trials for a mother – I have been
anxious all the week to send for you, ^& Clara all this^ week but until
this morning I was not aware that the
Unknown con-
sidered the case of our dear boy so nearly hopeless
had I known it in time I should have written this
morning for you to come tomorrow – I feel now that
a day lost is every thing – Gusy is part of the time
rational and has expressed a wish to see you both –
May God in his mercy grant that his gentle spirit
may not have departed before you come – I endeavour
to look this affliction calmly in the face but have
not strength at present – Our brother Jennings has
probably breathed his last – As much as Henry's parents
x Birth: 1769-11-27  Death: 1844-12-11  Birth: 1768-12-05  Death: 1849-08-24 

require his presence I am thankful he remained here
I will add a line in the morning – I have a good nurse who came
to day – Mrs Simpson
Unknown

Page 3

Saturday morning at 1/2 past 6 – Our precious child exhibits
more favourable symptoms this morning I have been with
him since 3 oclock – he has been in a perspiration the last hour
his cough is loosened and his tounge looks better – Worden
is to be here this morning but I doubt whether he goes
for you. I thought he was disinclined to go last night
and we had about come to the conclusion to send Mr Rogers
Unknown

I shall write every day — come to me as soon as you have
an opportunity dear Clara too if she can – I feel almost
afraid to indulge hope after such a day of despondency as
we had yesterday but God is powerful and merciful – Henry
will be obliged to leave the moment our child is pronounced out
of danger – I write in haste that I may send my letter in
time for the cars
your own Sister
Frances —