Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, December 16, 1842

  • Posted on: 5 October 2017
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, December 16, 1842
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:msr

student editor

Transcriber:spp:obm

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1842-12-16

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, December 16, 1842

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: msr 

revision: crb 2017-07-07

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Page 1

Friday morning—Dec 16th
My dear Sister,
I received your letter yesterday morning
I am sorry to hear you are suffering with "the cold"
I have been very much troubled since you went
away that you do not dress warmer—Why wont
you wear flannel waistcoats, (you are not obliged
to wear them next the skin) or cotton flannel if you
prefer, with long under sleeves of some kind—I
think you would find these with an additional
petticoat, very conducive to your comfort in the
winter—it is these necessary precautions which make
many persons with feeble constitutions appear so
insensible to the cold—Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
and I called to
see Mrs Miller
Birth: 1780-09-18 Death: 1850-03-09
last Friday the only time I
have been out, except to Church, since you left us—
She appeared to be in much the same frame of
mind that you represent Elsie
Unknown
—at any rate in
no pleasant frame—was so dissatisfied with
us for not coming over before that she scarcely spoke
Page 2

this is so exceedingly childish for a woman of 60 that I
concluded to stay away in future long enough to ensure
a civil reception—It is snowing to day as it
has done more or less every day this week—I have
had letters from both my boys
x Birth: 1830-07-08  Death: 1915-04-25  Birth: 1826-10-01  Death: 1876-09-11 
who are well—none
from Clarence
Birth: 1828-10-07 Death: 1897-07-24
yet—I have just finished a letter to Fred
and another to Dr Ward
Birth: 1806-10-23 Death: 1895-02-24
for medicine for Willie
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
—his
medicine has been out for a week—his eye continues in-
flamed and exceedingly weak—he is very busy the whole
time—he and Billy
Birth: 1829-10-22 Death: 1861-04-20Certainty: Possible
ride together on the sled—He says
he likes 'Albany because Fred stays there so much'—
I wish Fred could come home before the 1st as I doubt
very much whether Henry gets ready to come immediately
after—There is an answer to the Anti-Duellist in the
Journal of Wednesday—very good—if you do not see it
I will send it—Billy
Unknown
finally succeeded in swallowing
the slate pencil without the aid of a physician—he has
not complained of it since—has tied the present
pencil to his slate lest he should be tempted to swallow
that also—Our girl
Certainty: Possible
is rather too silly to make
her good nature available—she has the usual
Page 3

propensity of avoiding the truth as much as possible—
Maria comes Wednesday's and Saturday's yet—I am glad
Frances
Birth: 1826 Death: 1909-08-24
has the good sense to appreciate Mr Wood's
Birth: 1794 Death: 1859
officiousness
I wish there were some employment provided for old men
who have no families—the want of occupation often renders
people mischevious—Has the young man
Unknown
become an inmate
of the office—I am glad to hear old Mrs Clark
Birth: 1774 Death: 1842-11-30Certainty: Possible
is dead
she must have suffered much while living if the diseased
state of her nervous system had not destroyed her intellect—
I should like the 2d Vol of Mrs Jameson
Author: Mrs. Jameson Publisher: Harper & Brothers Place of Publication:New York City Date: 1840
but am in no hurry
The cloak is not dyed and I believe the man
Unknown
who is to do
it is still alive—Clara proposes to wait until he recovers—
Shall I send your dress to Smith
Unknown
? Jared Rathbone
Birth: 1791-08-02 Death: 1845-05-13
I
see has lost his little daughter
Birth: 1840 Death: 1842-12-13
over 2 years of age—
I hear nothing from Mrs Wright
Birth: 1806-12-25 Death: 1875-01-04
—will go and see her if the
weather ever proves suitable—I have seen no one this
week except Mrs Lucas
Birth: 1794-01-12 Death: 1876-05-12
and Mrs Abbot
Birth: 1790 Death: 1852-05-28
whom we met
at Mrs Millers the day we called—Mrs Lucas was
there to tea—Clara has had the hat remodelled it
is much improved—Last week one day when I had
been busily engaged bringing in furniture from the carriage
house and was unfit to see any one Mr Bowen
Birth: 1808-02-25 Death: 1886-09-29
came
Billy took him into the South room where there was a fire
Page 4

and called Pa
Birth: 1772-04-11 Death: 1851-11-13
who immediately invited him into the N. room calling
"Frances" in a stentorian voice as he passed the stair way
without intimating who it was that wished to see me—I sent
Abbey
Birth: 1822 Death: 1895-09-16
to see if the fire was good in the S. room and invite
them back again that I might have an opportunity of adjus-
ting my dress—She had hardly got up stairs before Pa came
again and in a loud angry tone said Mr Bowen was
just going to the rail road—seeing no prospect of
being admitted to my own room I sent Abbey to Mr Bowen
to say Mrs Seward desired him to excuse her, without any
apology whatever—I was very sorry as Mr Bowen had come
over in the stage a very unpleasant day expressly to see me—
but there is no remedy for such things—I wrote Henry a
statement of facts—Love to Frances
your own Sister—
Mrs Alvah Worden
Canandaigua
AUBURN, NY
DEC 16
x

Stamp

Type: postmark


[right Margin] I asked Willie what I should say to Aunty—he says "tell
her I am a good boy"—