Letter from Samuel Sweezey Seward to William Henry Seward, October 20, 1839

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Letter from Samuel Sweezey Seward to William Henry Seward, October 20, 1839
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:dwr

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1839-10-20

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Letter from Samuel Sweezey Seward to William Henry Seward, October 20, 1839

action: sent

sender: Samuel Seward
Birth: 1768-12-05  Death: 1849-08-24

location: Florida, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Albany, NY

transcription: dwr 

revision: ekk 2016-01-28

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Page 1

Florida 20 Oct 1839
My dear William Henry
During the summer & fall
it has by many been anticipated that in your
visit to New York you would make it convenient
to call and see us — This for myself I have not
looked for untill the present trip — The advanced
state of the season, the Legislative term drawing
nigh, the obstruction of the Navigation in Winter
and above all the age and extream feable state
of health of your dear Ma
Birth: 1769-11-27 Death: 1844-12-11
- and myself indused
me to think that you would imbrace this as the
best opportunity you have of seeing your aged
and infirm parents, we have therefore
steadfastly looked for you these two days — but
now conclude our hope is vain.
A most wonderfull strange disaster has
taken place relative to Dr Canfields
Birth: 1798-11-26 Death: 1865-01-05
children
x Birth: 1834-07-25  Death: 1922-02-28  Birth: 1832-02-20  Death: 1876-01-14  Birth: 1829-12-04  Death: 1867-10-25 

the information of which I know not how far
you have received — some two or three months
since Jennings
Birth: 1793-08-23 Death: 1841-02-24
called here on his way to N.Y. and
among other things observed that inasmuch as our
family had concluded to do something for those
Children he & Marcia
Birth: 1794-07-23 Death: 1839-10-28
had concluded to take Caroline
and there was no person so proper to go on to Bargon-
town
and attend to it as Marcia shortly after
Marcia comes (J. gone) she expressed the same
opinion this was not controverted by us althoug
we ’ had allalong expected that a general consultation
would have taken place to determine who should
take which — She made a short stay and started
on to B.T. shorty after her return the Dr brot
Francis and C. up and left them and their luggage
in caire of Marcia to be taken onto you when M.
returned West, stating that you had agreed to
take two of the C. They remained here (certainly

[left Margin] Mr Young
Unknown
is now puting the slate roof on the Vault. We cart the flaging stone for our pillairs & floor from
Valle — No pains or expense has been spared in the creation of this structure and I
confident it is one of the most permanent ever Erected in the Country. It will be ready for
the reception of our departed relatives shortly after the first of November When we should
be pleased to see you and family Jennings and his should be glad to advise with you on the


[top Margin] subject of there removal if time would admit but my paper is full
Strange to tell we have two regular Presbytirian C. in Florida well attended

Page 2

Welcome) five or six weeks, she all the while
exercising every act of guardian ship over them
at length Jennings came and soon after conversing
with Marcia Asked me what was to be done with
those C. — said I why you are going to take them on
with you I suppose — He collored like crimson and
said I am not — said I the Dr. brot them put them
under M. Caire left their all — every direction
and Money to bear their expense with her
said he she has taken no charge of them and ab—
solutely affirmed that he would have nothing
to do with them & insisted I should write to C. to come
and take them back. I was never more astonished
saying that I could prove by everyone about the
hour that M. took charge of them to take them on where
she went — I then told him knowing as he did that
we were sick and scarcely able to walk the room
that we had seven in EPS
Birth: 1799-07-02 Death: 1872-04-25
family
x Birth: 1836-02-16  Death: 1910-02-06  Birth: 1833  Death: 1892  Birth: 1828  Death: 1905  Birth: 1805-07-15  Death: 1848-05-14 
six in GWS
Birth: 1808-08-26 Death: 1888-12-07
and
Capt J. Famatur
Unknown
all to support and Look after
If he would say that we were the proper per—
sons to take charge of the education of those C
I would take them – No he knew better but I
should write to Canfeild to take his C.— said I
[ ther ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: there
was to be a consultation about them I always
stood ready to do any duty but had no agency in
bringing them away and should have none in
sending them back — I advised him as they had been
the cause of the C. being here to take them on & put
them to school for a short time till a conferance
could be had and all would be right. He again
peremptorily refused— I scolded I mourned I offered
to go on my Nees to him if he would take them &
make no more about it — all in vaine, he then said
said he would leave them at W or Uncle B. I asked
if he wished to place the odium on me of having it
said I would take caire of those C. That he must

[left Margin] Continues so accupied you cant write will not Francis or Augustus write and let us know
how many your family consists of whether the Judge is with you and a hundred other insid—
ents that will be pleasant to us to learn. With love to all affectionately your Samuel S
Seward

Page 3

Not leave them if he did I should take them. He went
out in great anger — returned and said he had one pro—
position to make viz I, I would write to you and
state the circumstance he would take them along
to this he I cheerfully agreed. I wrote handed him
the letter he read it made me no answer, went
out sometime returned with Israels
Birth: 1795-09-03 Death: 1869
team drove round
turned toward Warwick came in they began to load up
the little things said they were going to write stories
They gave none of Our family any information
of their movement. We all thought he was going
to take the C home with him untill the boy
Unknown
that
brot the waggon back told us Israel had gone back
with the them. I was thunderstruck to think that
BJS should forfit his sacred word with hi [hole]
[ fa ]
x

Supplied

Reason: wax-seal
ther and bring down the vengence of th [hole]
country on us for sending back the C whe [hole]
knew nothing of it and not one word to do [hole]
the whole Circumstance. Israel is destroyed
that he has been so duped and Candfeild
[ Affirs ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: Affirms
and shows letters saying that Marcia
received money of him to bear their expenses &
agreed to take them on. To be thus set up as a
mark to be shot at by a son who with his wife
have been the whole actors themselves is too bad.
This statement has been read by ma she agrees in
every word of it. We have also deemed it advisable
that you should be apprised of it.
Dear Henry Your fortunate wise & usefull
administration., The feeling and merited ap—
plause you receive from every part of the Union
is a matter of high gratification to your parents
Many times tears of of joy rush involuntarily into
our eyes on reading those feeling abolutions of the
heart so often expressed. One thing we fear
that your constant labour study & Toiling on

[left Margin] you will please excuse errors as I can not look it over
Page 4

Will prove too hard for your constitution and disease will ensue. It seems
to me that every day you should have a portion of time set a part for relax—
ation. When that hour some you should despence with all business
and company. The world is nothing without health it is therefore to be
studied Now that you have got settled in Albany, dear Frances
Birth: 1805-09-24 Death: 1865-06-21
and Her
dear little boys
x Birth: 1839-06-18  Death: 1920-04-29  Birth: 1830-07-08  Death: 1915-04-25  Birth: 1826-10-01  Death: 1876-09-11 
at home how much we should enjoy a short visit at
your house but of this the want of health depresses us. May the God
of all mercies preserve you all. One word on the Wyman
Unknown
case I have
no idea he will consent to any stipulation. The Int is now running
on the third year. In the event that he will not shall I bring an Ejectment
on the lease this first of Dec (payment due) and if so — put it in Phillips
Birth: 1805-03-20 Death: 1841-12-17
& Wilners
Birth: 1777 Death: 1842-02-20

hand or elsewhere. If your time would admit of your writing
shall be glad of a [ er ]
x

Alternate Text

Alternate Text: letter
in which please direct me as Wymans case. I have no
confidence in our lawyers. Our annual Elections is at hand I fear
our friends do not sufficiently appreciate the importance of it
The southern & western states have disappointed us. Van Burens
Birth: 1782-12-05 Death: 1862-07-24
distribution
of the public lands has bot those states and robed the Old ones This should be
beat into every New Yorker. New Jersey has done her duty this
is cheering. The conservatives in this Country are just coming out
the office holders have so beat it into them that the Whigs are old federalists
that many of them shudder at the thought. If your term
William H. Seward
Governor of the State of New York
Albany
Unknown
S.S. Seward
Oct 20. 1839

[right Margin] I l[ amen ]
x

Supplied

Reason: wax-seal
t Judge Spencers
Birth: 1790-05-13 Death: 1857-04-25Certainty: Probable
declining