Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, October 15, 1846

  • Posted on: 16 October 2018
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, October 15, 1846
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:pxc

student editor

Transcriber:spp:msr

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1846-10-15

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, October 15, 1846

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: pxc 

revision: crb 2018-07-16

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Page 1

Thursday Oct 15th
My dear Sister,
I will think it strange that I
am so remiss about writing – I have nevertheless
good reasons to assign – Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
went to Geneva
the day before Eliza
Birth: 1833 Death: 1884-07-25
left – Friday Clarence
Birth: 1828-10-07 Death: 1897-07-24

came home with the horses because he was too
ill to remain and pursue his studies – the old
school have leached his head until they
have nearly paralyzed his brain – he could
neither study or read – was low spirited and
nervous – I gave him China tumeric – he improved
visibly the three days he was at home –
Henry came home Saturday night and went
to Albany Monday afternoon taking Clarence
with him – Clarence will go to Florida to
recruit – I of course had as much as I could
do to get his clothes and Henry's in readiness
Monday and Teusday I was sick some of the
time in bed with toothache – Yesterday I
was just sitting down to write when your
letter came – that required a little deliberation
so to day after making my quince sweetmeats
I make the attempt to write with dear Sister
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29

by my side she has made this scratch with
her pencil – says she is writing –

[top Margin] Fan often says I want to see Dida" the other day
she sat a long time looking very serious when she
said "Aunty gone home" – She is like Fred about
books it will be hard to keep her from learning to read she

Page 2

I am sorry for your disappointment about a removal
but I have always considered it very uncertain
I would not on any account were I in your place
try to induce Worden
Birth: 1797-03-06 Death: 1856-02-16
to C change his mind for
the purpose of facilitating Henry's
Birth: 1822-02-03 Death: 1888-11-24
success in
business – I speak very freely and to you alone
when I say I consider his marriage with
Frances
Birth: 1826 Death: 1909-08-24
as a matter by no means beyond a
doubt – and you can readily imagine how
much the unpleasantness of this issue would
be enhanced by the reflection that Wordens
business had been in any way deranged in antici-
pation of an event which should not occur –
Henry cannot feel any more assured on this subject
than Clarence did last Winter – You will
say Clarence was younger and with less firmness
of principle – I admit this but I am inclined
to believe that the caprice which suggested
the annulment of the engagement was not
confined to him alone – I am sorry for Henry's
disappointment but all circumstances considered
think he is wise in determining to leave Canandaigua
Men all agree in saying that young men are more
successful when dependent upon their own exertions
— alone – in as much as I cannot apply this
sort of philosophy to my own children I will
not use it in this case – I think Henry has sufficient
energy of character to succeed alone and though
Page 3

it may require a more protracted effort and
more patience still it is much better than with
assistance grudgingly given
Having changed my mind two or three times in relation
to Eliza Sister
Unknown
I am not yet quite certain what
is best – there are many reasons on both sides of
the question – could I get a girl here with
whom I am tolerably acquainted I should prefer
to do so – I have heard of but one little girl
Unknown
and
do not yet know even her name – I believe it is best
to take Margaret provided she comes entirely satisfied
with 5 shillings a week which I think is quite
as much as a girl of her age can expect if she
is older [ th ]
x

Supplied

Reason: wax-seal
an 12 or 13 she is older than I wish –
Of course I must pay her fare here – if she comes I will
send money. If you think best to alter this determination
in any way you can do so – I shall be content –
If Peters
Unknown
Mary Jane
Unknown
should come which is very doubtful
Maria
Unknown
thinks she can be had for the price I have
named though she is 14 – Margaret's fare will
make her wages for me 6/ for eight weeks at
least – Grandpa
Birth: 1772-04-11 Death: 1851-11-13
received the book
x

– it was an
immense affair – I have a letter from Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
who
is well – How the horrid accounts of the war
make me shudder I dare not think of the
future – may God preserve my boy – I hope
to write you a less hurried letter next time
Love to all – Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
is well – Your own
Sister –
Page 4

already knows five or six letters and whenever Willie
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29

reads brings her book to read too – Willie is
very much engrossed with nutting– he goes
almost every day – reminding me much of Gus –
Miss Sheridan has been here three weeks and will probably
be here two more – she has copied Henrys picture for
herself and is now taking Fan's – "I believe you are
never alone" said Mrs Porter
Birth: 1800-04-12 Death: 1886-03-29
– I told her I had
been with my own family just 3 days since the 1st of June
Mrs Alvah Worden
Canandaigua
AUBURN N.Y.
OCT 17
x

Stamp

Type: postmark

Hand Shiftx

Lazette Worden

Birth: 1803-11-01 Death: 1875-10-03
1846