Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, November 30, 1846

  • Posted on: 16 October 2018
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, November 30, 1846
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:pxc

student editor

Transcriber:spp:msr

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1846-11-30

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, November 30, 1846

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: pxc 

revision: crb 2018-07-16

<>
Page 1

Monday evening
My dear Sister,
I am sorry to learn by your
letter that you have been ill – the dismal
weather we have had for a week past has not
been particularly calculated make any one
feel in very exuberant spirits – I hope the
good people at Canandaigua will manage
to be amused this Winter – how eminently
childish it does appear to see women 40
years of age seeking occupation to pass
away time – I wonder if such persons ever
arrive at the knowledge that they are
responsible beings and are required to make
themselves useful in their day and generation
I have not the least knowledge of the
amusements of the people in our village
either present or prospective – I manage
to get to Clara's
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
once a week but unless
she has seen Debby
Birth: 1810 Death: 1888-03-16
I do not learn much
that is new from her – Yesterday I prepared
to go to Church but the horses were so active
that I abandoned my purpose and left Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10

and Willie
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
to go alone – Dennis
Birth: 1827
sobered
the animals by driving them about town
all church time — Henry went to Coopers-
town
last week during that violent storm –

[top Margin] and happy in his domestic relations
of course this was not the
best ground for this surmise –
I like Margaret
Unknown
very much – you can tell her mother
Unknown
if
you see her that I shall allow her 6/ per week –

Page 2

was obliged to walk and push the engine
occasionally on the rail road and after
he left Fort Plain, Thanksgiving day,
to walk about two thirds of the way
to Cooperstown frequently stopping to help
the driver
Unknown
extricate the sleigh and four
horses from a snow drift – He came
home late Saturday night and Sunday
evening at six oclock took the cars
again for New York – I think he will
destroy himself by this continual driving
from one place to another and then engaging
in some exciting controversy – he will
be absent all this week – Maria is getting
along slowly but I fear will remain deaf
I must have mentioned her deafness which
came on during her illness and has continued
to increase – has returned but
I do not know whether he does any thing
for her – I have not been there recently –
I should like very much to come out
Christmas but it is altogether uncertain
there are so many contingencies that I
think it not best to expect us – Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25

will come if you wish it – I will come
if I can – were it not that I have lost another
tooth and am thereby impelled to seek a
dentist I should perhaps give up coming
Page 3

at all, the cold weather is so unin-
viting for expeditions with children, and
trust to your coming to see me which
you can do as well as not if Worden
Birth: 1797-03-06 Death: 1856-02-16
is
away as I presume he will be in the course of
the winter – I find Fred very agreeable
company so much so that I dread the
time when Clarence
Birth: 1828-10-07 Death: 1897-07-24
will come home and
monopolize him – now he is seldom out
of the house, never for an evening – I should
be blessed far beyond my deserts could I
have all my children at home again
for one year – but I fear that time is not
coming – Willie draws Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
out
on his hand sleigh every day which she
enjoys exce[ e ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 
dingly – she is well and very
merry – had an ill turn which lasted only
one day last week – Walter Cary
Birth: 1818-12-21 Death: 1880-11-01
spent the
day with us Wednesday – on his way from
Boston N. York &c – he is now going to Buffalo
to commence the practice of medicine – he made
many enquires about you and Frances
Birth: 1826 Death: 1909-08-24

Am I mistaken in thinking you sent a note to Clara by
Eliza
Birth: 1833 Death: 1884-07-25
with the packet – I sent it by Willie with
a caution if I rember rightly not to lose the note
which was tied on the outside – he left it at Mc
Lallens
Birth: 1791 Death: 1860-11-16
shop and says he remembers seeing it
with the note appended – I do not know how
long it remained at the shop but I believe some time
and when Clara got it the note was gone
Page 4

I hope it contained nothing treasurable – Sampsons
Birth: 1809-04-18 Death: 1876-10-03

work is called "Sampsons Medical Jurisprudence"
 Publisher: Highley Place of Publication:London, England Date: 1841

I believe – I have not seen the work you mention
I have read Dombey & son
Author: Charles Dickens Publisher: John WIley Place of Publication:New York, NY Date: 1848
and am much interested
in it – Fred has amused me to day with
Yankee Doodle – "it is very funny" as Fanny says
I am sorry to hear what you write of the Waylands
x Birth:   Death: 1867-01-28  Birth:   Death: 1863-10-16 

it is an unthankful world and his profession one
which allows great scope to the ungenerous & exacting
remember me to them kindly —
Mrs Alvah Worden
Canandaigua
AUBURN N.Y.
DEC 1
x

Stamp

Type: postmark


[right Margin] How sickening the details of the wreck of the Atlantic
There was nothing to be said about Mr Ortons
Birth: 1801-07-14 Death: 1846-11-18
death except
what you saw – A rumour without the shadow of a
foundation prevailed, that he had committed suicide
he was in good health p prosperous in his business


[left Margin]
Unknown
1847