Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Maria Worden, December 24, 1858

  • Posted on: 14 January 2021
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Maria Worden, December 24, 1858
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:mlb

student editor

Transcriber:spp:cnk

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1858-12-24

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Maria Worden, December 24, 1858

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Kirkwood House, Washington D.C.

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: mlb 

revision: agw 2020-11-15

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Page 1

Friday Dec 24th
My dear Sister,
I will write to day though
you will not be in Auburn when
this letter reaches there – I fancy
you went yesterday to spend
Christmas with Frances
Birth: 1826-12-12 Death: 1909-08-24
– & that
to day you are having sport with
Frank
Birth: 1854-02 Death: 1931-05-23
– I saw a little boy
Unknown
in the
street the other day that reminded
me of Frank– with a black hat
and feather and little coat
rather longer than other boys
wear– he looked like a very
nice little boy – We have
gleams of sunshine occasionally
to day– I hope it may be pleasant

[top Margin] If this letter seems illnatured impute it to
the headache– Love to Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
who I hope
is better & a happy Christmas to all–
your own
Sister

Page 2

tomorrow for the sake of those who
calculate on the pleasures of a holiday
Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
has gone to Miss Howland’s
Birth: 1827-11-20 Death: 1929-06-29
school
this morning to take a pair of
mittens she has been knitting for
a scholar
Unknown
who has none– Miss
Howland always inquires of your
welfare– She is very busy and
cheerful as she always is- I think
it is much more pleasant for her
now that she has a companion
x

 


Miss Miner
Birth: 1815-03-04 Death: 1864-12-17
fortunately continues
on her travels yet– It is a beau-
tiful sight to see one devoting
themselves so entirely to the improve-
ment & happiness of others as Miss
Howland does– such labours
bring their own reward– Now
that the Winter Solstice is passed
Page 3

I hope the days will soon be percep-
tibly longer– it has been a dark
month– Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
dines with Gen. Cass
Birth: 1786-01-17 Death: 1864-02-05

to day and tomorrow at the Blairs
x

 


Will
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
is to have some young gentle-
man
Unknown
to dine with him here for
which occasionLouise
Birth: 1825
proposed to
make a plumb pudding– I have
just made out a long list of cards
to be left by Will or Fanny to day–
How tiresome and senseless it seems–
Mrs Gwyn
Birth: 1815-06 Death: 1901-06-26
thinks otherwise– She
has just returned from “abroad”
her equipage passed here yesterday–
it is the admiration of servants
children and weak people generally
A showy carriage drawn by
five horses- with a coachman
and footman in gorgeous livery
the latter standing behind
Page 4

the carriage– Her matinees will
undoubtedly be very full this Winter–
So will Mrs Douglas'
Birth: 1835 Death: 1899-01-26
if her wily
husband
x

 

thinks it politic to use her
for a lure when they return from
Cuba
x

Cuba

– I suppose you see the revers–
al of the slave trad trade which
Henry’s Rochester speech predicted has
come– A cargo of slaves landed
and sold in Georgia– This is the
progress of the U.S – of America in
this 19th century– How long God will
permit such iniquity to go unchecked
is not a matter for calculation– it
certainly evinces little a sad depar-
ture from the Religion taught by
his Son– Is it any less revolting
than the return of the Mormons to the
a sensual indulgences of the ancient
Jews? Lord Napier
Birth: 1819-09-19 Death: 1898-12-19
thinks the
President
Birth: 1791-04-23 Death: 1868-06-01
is seriously engaged in check-
ing

[right Margin] this piracy!!