Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February 6, 1862

  • Posted on: 22 February 2018
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February 6, 1862
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:msr

student editor

Transcriber:spp:tap

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1862-02-06

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, February 6, 1862

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Philadelphia, PA

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: msr 

revision: crb 2018-01-25

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Page 1

Thursday Feb 6th—
My dear Sister
Your Sunday letter came
last evening—we all heard
it read and found it very
refreshing—it seems like
being home—where I wish
I could be—I shall have
much to tell you when
I come— Before you get
this Mr Sackett
Birth: 1790-08-09 Death: 1865-06-02
will have
been to see you, as he thought
he would stop on his way
home—he was here Teusday
evening—not seeming quite
as well as when he went
on—Dissipation does not
agree with old people generally

[top Margin] from Washington—it seems to me to be
a judicous and humane plan—

Page 2

I presume he felt the change
in accustomed habits, though
he did not say so—
Yesterday Jenny
Birth: 1839-11-18 Death: 1913-11-09
sent a telegram
to Will
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
but has not yet
received any answer—She has
a very bad cold which
she took in Washington and
has increased here—if she gets
home without being ill I
shall think it fortunate.
I hope Aunt Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
will
dispose of that last boarder—
I am impatient to see Augustus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11

again to see what can be
done before she destroys
her remaining health—She
cannot be persuaded that
work hurts her—there is no
other way but to so arrange
Page 3

matters that she will not
find so much to do—
I am very sorry about James
Woodruff
Birth: 1840-07-25 Death: 1879-06-04
—I do not see how
he can live under such treat-
ment—but he may—Anna
Birth: 1836-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02

has her trouble about Tad Lincoln
Birth: 1853-04-04 Death: 1871-07-15

who is suffering from old school
treatment. I suppose there is no
remedy until women are more en-
lightened——I think I told you
before I came away that I had engaged
a cook for the 1 of April—Mrs
Adams
Birth: 1808-04-25 Death: 1889-06-06Certainty: Possible
told me Katy
Birth: 1837 Death: 1878-04-08
preferred the
other work and I think she had
better take it—Jenny thinks she
will ask Mrs Chedell
Birth: 1839-04-06 Death: 1911
about the
girl
Unknown
I had engaged and if she
is honest will take her when
Page 4
she comes—I thought when I engaged
her I should be home the 1 of April
Would you advise occupying the
lower kitchen when another girl
Unknown

comes or wait until I return—
I do not know that it makes much
difference—Would you not let
William take Cleo's calf if he
wants it—if not let Jackson
Unknown
take
it till I come home? Do you
think of any thing better? It is better
I am sure to take it from the cow
immediately— I send you an
account of a meeting for the relief
of the contrabands—Did you read Mr
Pierce's
Birth: 1829-03-29 Death: 1897
report—the Government agent who
was sent to Port Royal—He has now
returned with about 60 persons
Unknown
who
are to superintend & direct the work of
the negroes—12 or 15 are women who are
to establish & teach industrial schools
Among these are Mrs Harlan
Birth: 1824 Death: 1884-09-04
wife of Senator
Harlan
Birth: 1820-08-26 Death: 1899-10-05
of Iowa
x

Iowa

& Mrs Johnson
Birth: 1801-12-12 Death: 1871-03-19
& her sister
Birth: 1807-03-10 Death: 1871-07-29