Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 22, 1838

  • Posted on: 19 December 2017
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 22, 1838
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:nwh

student editor

Transcriber:spp:lmd

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1838-01-22

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, January 22, 1838

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: New York, NY

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Canandaigua, NY

transcription: nwh 

revision: lmd 2017-10-30

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Page 1

New York Monday 22d 1838
My dearest Sister,
I endeavored yesterday to find
sufficient energy to write you a letter but did not
succeed — I took cold at Philadelphia which was
increased by my journey hither and I am now
laid up with a moderate intermitting fever which
I have so often had before — Henry's
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
business detained
him at Philadelphia until Thursday evening when
we left for this city — took the Trenton rail
road as far as that place — crossed over 6 miles by
stage to the Camden and Amboy rail road which
carried us to Amboy where we took the steam
boat at 12 at night — left Philadelphia at 6
The fog was so dense that the Capt
Unknown
– of the boat thought
it hazardous to attempt crossing the Bay until
the rising of the moon — we therefore lay at the
dock until 2 oclock — then took the ou[ t ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 
ward
passage outside of Staten island — I think
Frances
Birth: 1826 Death: 1909-08-24
will be able to trace our route on the
atlas — it was four oclock when we arrived
at New York — the boat rocked and creaked
so dreadfully while we were crossing the bay
that I was much alarmed — the little boys
x Birth: 1830-07-08  Death: 1915-04-25  Birth: 1826-10-01  Death: 1876-09-11 

were both sound asleep in their births — I went
to the gentlemens cabin and awoke Henry — he
laughed at my fears, but came and sat with
Page 2

my fear abated — It was 5 oclock when we reached the
Astor House — very dark and the rain falling in torrents
we all went to bed so soon as our rooms were
prepared — I awoke at 8 oclock with my cough
much increased — a stricture across the chest
and slight fever — it is now monday I am not
still unable to leave the house — but not confined
to my bed — have employed no physician — living on
water gruel and slippery elm tea — Henry and my little
boys are my nurses — we shall leave here as soon
as I am able to leave the house — You may im-
agine how impatient I am to be on my return —
I would prefer going immediately to Auburn without
visiting Orange County but shall be guided by Henrys
advice — I found one letter from you and two from Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05

I am afraid you are more unwell than usual as
your letter was evidently written in depressed spirits
I hope to get another before we leave town — My sickness
deprived me of an opportunity of seeing Washington
Irving
Birth: 1783-04-03 Death: 1859-11-28
and Mrs Jameison
Birth: 1794-05-17 Death: 1860-03-17
author of "Characters of the
Female Sovereigns"
Author: Anna Jameson Publisher: J. & J. Harper Place of Publication:New York Date: 1832
— We were invited to meet them
at Mrs Duers
Birth: 1783 Death: 1864-12-26
Mr Duer
Birth: 1782-10-07 Death: 1858-08-08
called with his
daughter
Unknown
to invite me — he was with us at
Philadelphia – I like him much – something of the same
sort of regard we had for Col Mynderse
Birth: 1767-07-11 Death: 1838-01-31

but he is not like the Col — We have many other
invitations out — of course I accept none — Mrs
Webb
 Death: 1848-07-01
continues to be very polite and kind to me —
I do not think her little girls
x Birth: 1830-12-14  Death: 1918-12-04  Birth: 1827-11-30  Death: 1896-10-03 
half as interesting as our
Page 3

Fan but you need not tell Fan so — it seems to me
I never was so anxious to see you all — Henry is very busy
all the time — We found Uncle Cary
Birth: 1786-08-11 Death: 1869-06-20
here when we came
back from Philadelphia — he is now at that place
will return here to go h home with us — Col Stone
Birth: 1792-04-20 Death: 1844-08-15

has just been here he looks haggard and care worn — is
much embarrassed in his pecuniary affairs — I read
yesterday a review of his book on Animal Magnetism
which I think he will not find very flattering
it concludes with a description of Mr Durants
Birth: 1805-09-19 Death: 1873-03-02
visit
to Miss Brackett
Birth: 1816-09-12 Death: 1857-02-09
given in his own words — It is in
the December No of the American Quarterly Review
I wish you would read it — it has satisfied me
that Stone was imposed upon — nothing is said now
about Animal Magnetism — I think it must
mortify Stone — We lived so quietly at Philadelphia
that I was sorry to return again to this busy
town — where all is bustle and noise — I have
not been in bed today and hope I shall be able
to keep up until evening should I be no worse
tomorrow I think we can leave here Wednesday —
It is cold today — I presume the river is not open
above Poughkeepsie — The boys send love — Henry is
dining out — if we are detained here longer than
Wednesday I will write again — your own sister Frances
Page 4

Mrs Alvah Worden
Canandaigua
Ontario County
New–YORK
JAN 23
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