Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, August, 1861

  • Posted on: 27 July 2016
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, August, 1861
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:sss

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1861-08

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, August, 1861

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Unknown
Unknown

transcription: sss 

revision: ekk 2015-06-30

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Page 1

Monday morning
7 oclock.
My dear Sister
Louisa
Birth: 1825
& Nicholas
Birth: 1801-12-24 Death: 1893

and I are up this morning[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

I am waiting for the city
Housemaid
Unknown
(who has not
risen) to bring me some water
to bathe. Were there not
two long pairs of stairs between
me and the kitchen I
should get it myself.
This spacious mansion was
built some 40 years ago
by Commodore Rogers
Birth: 1772-07-11 Death: 1838-08-01
for
his own residence - it has
since been occupied successively
by various members of
different cabinets & then
used for a boarding house[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

Page 2

It is built well as good
houses were in those days[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

The situation is especially
good affording a free
circulation of air in all
directions - in front ^West^ is
the Presidents Park which
separates it from the White
House – ^obliquely^ on the South side
is an open building lot
between this & the next
dwelling – on the North
the house of Ogle Taloe
Birth: 1796-05-21 Death: 1868-02-25

with a carriage way
between the two houses
communicating with both
stables – on the East
bank of our stable there are
some low buildings which
Page 3

do not obstruct the
circulation of air, we have
a sky view over as far
back as the Patent Office
which is East of us.
Anna
Birth: 1836-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
says she has not at any
time felt the heat as much
as she used to in Albany .
The continual breeze
reminds me of Pisgah.
The trees which are very
large and beautiful
affording shade on all sides
are all on neighbouring
grounds except one large
willow in the little yard.
The larger trees from the
Park overhang the road[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

But you are more interested
to know what we are doing &saying. At New York we saw
Richard Blatchford
Birth: 1798-04-24 Death: 1875-09-04
& Thurlow
Weed
Birth: 1797-11-15 Death: 1882-11-22
- they were up with
Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
until a late hour.
Page 4

The trunk containing our night clothes
being sent on by mistake we
we left without such garments
at the Astor House – I was too
tired to sleep though the others
did. We rose at 5 taking
the cars at 7. Mr Weed
came with us across the Ferry[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

He seems old and looks troubled.
Henry gets very tired with perpetual
talking but is well. Yesterday
we went with the President
Birth: 1809-02-12 Death: 1865-04-15
to
visit 2 camps which are on
the other side of the East Branch
of the Potomac, between Washington
and Baltimore. There are some
4 or 5 encampments in this region.
We visited the 3d Mass. commanded
by Col. Taylor
Birth: 1796-05-04 Death: 1864-06-29
- another called
an eclectic Regiment consisting
of companies from many different
states Commanded by Col. Dwight
Birth: 1830-09-15 Death: 1902-04-08

of Mass. both a part of the
Sickles Brigade. They had
just heard the news of the
victory at Ft. Hatteras & were
Page 5

in fine spirits. These camps were
pleasantly situated on each on
the side of a hill. The Marques
& the tents which I looked into
were very clean. There was
nothing offensive about that part
of the camp which we visited[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

The men were sunburnt but
looked well & in good condition[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

There were some sick in both
camps which were in their tents
not sufficiently ill to be sent
to the Hospital in Washington.
The men were soon "got into line"
and recieved by the President
who with Henry & the Col -
passed in front of each line
with uncovered heads at
3 o'clock in the afternoon
with a burning sun. I am
not able to say why they escape
sun strokes. The bands
gave us some fine music
Annie Louise & Yankee Doodle
I remember. After some
pleasant conversation with the

[left Margin] Don't fail to let me know if any of you are
sick[ . ]
x

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Reason: 
I can come home in two days[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 
Sister

Page 6

superior officer
Unknown
in the Marque
we drove home to dinner at
5 – our party consisted of
The President Henry Father
Credon
 Death: 1870-05-08
, Jenny
Birth: 1839-11-18 Death: 1913-11-09
& I in one
carriage, Henry Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25

Mr Nicolay
Birth: 1832-02-26 Death: 1901-09-26
(the Presidents
secretary) Anna
Birth: 1836-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02
& Fanny
Birth: 1844-12-09 Death: 1866-10-29
in
the other. Returning we transferred
the President to his own carriage
taking He Fred & Mr Nicolay
into ours. The carriages
are so similar that I saw
no difference. The President's
was more expensive. Nicholas
says ours are the best horses[ . ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

I am sure the horses would
say ours was the best Coachman
as I saw that Irishman
Unknown

whip the Presidents horses
when the poor creatures were
frightened. I think they are
younger than ours, but it is
impossible to tell with poor
management.
Page 7

The President appears like a plain
unassuming farmer – not ackward
or ungainly but equally removed
from polish of manner. His
conversation is sensible. The
subjects on which we talked,
the war & the crops were
perfectly familiar to him –
he talked easily sometimes
amusingly. As I told Fred
I was determined to like
him & I did. He looks
better than most of the prints
represent him. It has been
intimated
Inmost; inward • Near; close • Close in friendship or acquaintance • One to whom the thoughts of another are shared without reserve • To share together • To hint; to suggest obscurely; to give slight notice of •
to me that I may not
succeed as well in a similar
determination regarding Mrs
Lincoln
Birth: 1818-12-13 Death: 1882-07-16
. We shall see – if she
returns while I am here – I
went on with Henry to see
the President yesterday morning
well before our dinner. The White
House is undergoing repairs –
it looked unattractive
enough inside. We shall not
have an opportunity of seeing
Page 8

whether Anna could improve it as
she has this old house of Commmodore
Rogers. I think a woman of taste
and executive capacity might
do much there – if she could
be disinterested enough to try.
But it is usually left to the
servants – and shows it.
The women have to take care of
themselves – "it is a duty they owe
Society". I hope dear Sister
you are well since May has come
back – you were so sick the
day before I left. I hope Aunt
Clara
Birth: 1793-05-01 Death: 1862-09-05
is well too & will not
be troubled because Mrs Hills
Birth: 1796 Death: 1863-04-22
has
had a cancer 23 years & is suffering
with a complicate of disorders.
I wish I could see you all.
Give my love to Sarah Hance
Birth: 1820-01-25 Death: 1867-06-10
if
she is still with you. Cooks
are plenty at Fortress Munroe &
want places – would you advise
me to take one. Gov. Butler
Birth: 1818-11-05 Death: 1893-01-11

is here - so is Mr Russell
Birth: 1820-03-28 Death: 1907-02-11
.`
I wish he were not to be invited here
to dinner. Fanny has gone to find
Lizzie McLean
Unknown
. Sanford
Birth: 1823-06-15 Death: 1891-05-21
was here to
see me this morning, but I am at

[left Margin] the bottom of the 4th page – I will find a large sheet
for the next letter. Love to Will
Birth: 1839-06-18 Death: 1920-04-29
. Fanny is writing to him.