Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, March 18, 1852

  • Posted on: 18 July 2019
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, March 18, 1852
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:tap

student editor

Transcriber:spp:cnk

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1852-03-18

In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's persons.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "pla" point to place elements in the project's places.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's staff.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's bibl.xml authority file. verical-align: super; font-size: 12px; text-decoration: underline; text-decoration: line-through; color: red;

Letter from Frances Miller Seward to Lazette Miller Worden, March 18, 1852

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: Lazette Worden
Birth: 1803-11-01  Death: 1875-10-03

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: tap 

revision: tap 2019-02-28

<>
Page 1

Washington March 18th
My dear Sister,
I feel that my letters so hurriedly
written are a poor return for the long
and entertaining ones you send me – I think
sometimes that I will write a little every
day for I forget what I write or rather
to whom – you or Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
– but every day
being its own peculiar occupation –
When Mr
Birth: 1786-08-11 Death: 1869-06-20Certainty: Probable
& Mrs Cary
Birth: 1787-08-11 Death: 1863-06-22Certainty: Probable
came they broke up
my school which has not been thoroughly
organized since – the French lesson
and sitting for their pictures are daily
interruptions just at this time – It is
impossible for me to tell when I left off
writing to you – I will assume that it
was a week ago – Friday evening we all
went to hear the Hutchinsons
x Birth: 1817-03-14  Death: 1859  Birth: 1821-01-04  Death: 1908-10-29  Birth: 1823-03-14  Death: 1884-11-25 
who being
under the ban as abolitionists we felt
obliged to patronize – I liked them for their
apparent love of each other and for their
natural singing – Saturday – Mr
Birth: 1801 Death: 1860-07-15
& Mrs
Howe
Birth: 1808 Death: 1866-04-16
dined with us with four gentlemen
x
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown Birth: 1804-09-22  Death: 1860-07-07 

among them Mr Schoolcraft – in the evening
Page 2

we went to see Miss Davenport
Birth: 1829-05-03 Death: 1903-08-02
who was
quite as attractive as when we saw
her last Winter – the other performers
Unknown

were very indifferent – Sunday, although
I had made an engagement with Mrs
Sackett
Birth: 1822-02-06 Death: 1874-11-17
to go to Church, I was too ill
to go out indeed I sat up but little all
all day – Tuesday Henry
Birth: 1801-05-16 Death: 1872-10-10
had invited 5 or 6
gentlemen
Unknown
to dinner – When I arose in the
morning the first piece of information
that I received was that Mary
Birth: 1819-11-24 Death: 1854-12-18Certainty: Possible
had
been sick all night & was unable to
do any thing, then came a messenger
saying Thomas
Unknown
, our waiter could not
come round because he was sick, Miss
Bennet
Unknown
then said that she did not
feel able to get up that morning – the
prospect of a dinner was rather discour-
aging – I went first for Mrs Thompson
Unknown

and then drove all about town in pursuit
of a waiter finally as an especial
favour succeeded in getting a competent
one to give me three hours of his
invaluable time, he and all the others
being engaged to Mr Corcoran
Birth: 1798-12-27 Death: 1888-02-24
for the
evening – N.B. At Mr Corcoran's last
Page 3

soirée he had a quantity of plates stolen
by his guests
Unknown
– many of whom came
without invitations – I worked hard all
the morning & when dinner time came
I felt very little like going to the table –
The party consisted of Messrs McCrea
Birth: 1815-01-10 Death: 1868-05-31
& Brooks
Birth: 1813-12-25 Death: 1869-02-18

senator from Missisippi Lieut Page
Birth: 1808-01-04 Death: 1899-10-25Certainty: Possible
U.S.N.
and Charles Sumner
Birth: 1811-01-06 Death: 1874-03-11
and a gentleman from
Boston by the name of Forbes
Birth: 1813-02-23 Death: 1898-10-12Certainty: Possible
– I left
the table early to attend to my patients –
Mary was in bed all day – George Grier
Birth: 1802-09-27 Death: 1878-12-20

dined from home that day – Wednesday was
the day appointed for Senator Jones
Birth: 1809-04-20 Death: 1859-10-29
of
Tenessee to reply to Henry on intervention –
so I went early to the Capitol – but
the senate Chamber was smoky –
the day was rainy – and the galleries
were thin – so the speech was
deferred until Thursday – Mr Grier
and I went to the House of Rep– where
we heard a speech from a free soil
Democrat
Birth: 1795-10-06 Death: 1864-05-27Certainty: Possible
of Ohio – we stayed here until
it was nearly time for the Senate to
adjourn – went for the children
x Birth: 1839-06-18  Death: 1920-04-29  Birth: 1844-12-09  Death: 1866-10-29 
whom I
had left in Frankensteins
Birth: 1817-12-19 Death: 1881-04-16
room – picked
up Henry and drove home. Yesterday (it is
now Friday) I arose with a bad headache
Page 4

but I did not like to relinquish my intention
of hearing Mr Jones so I went up with
medicine in my pocket – The galleries were
very satisfactorily filled and the speech
was adapted to the audience – you will
read it – Jones has always been a very
popular speaker at political meetings
that I should think his forte though
Henry says I undervalue him – Henry is
very charitable & generous – I think Jones
is a generous man, that is as generous
as a man can be who has always
lived at the South – it was evident
his sympathies were on the side opposite
the one he advocated. I have not yet
heard the general impression made by
his speech but I am quite sure that
Henry's is not affected by – George Grier
left this morning – I came home sick
from the Senate & have ^was^ not able to bid
him good bye – I have your two letters
from Auburn – I am sorry Dennis
Birth: 1827
is so faithless
but I think as it will not now be
more than 6 weeks before I go home that
it is hardly worth while to take Bob
away – I wish very much to engage
the colored woman
Unknown
you mention. I know
all about her & presume I will find
x

Editorial Note

There is probably more pages to this letter, but this is all we have in our collections.